Syndicated Radio Host Michael Berry: White People Don't Kill People The Way Black People Do

Syndicated Radio Host Michael Berry: White People Don't Kill People The Way Black People Do

Berry: "Black People Don't Believe That Black Lives Matter"

Blog ››› ››› SALVATORE COLLELUORI

Syndicated radio host Michael Berry commented on the beating of a teenage girl at a New York City restaurant by saying, "You know why white lives matter? Because that's what white people believe. The dirty little secret is, black people don't believe that black lives matter."

On the March 12 edition of his Houston-based show, Berry described video footage of the beating, in which four girls attacked a 15-year-old girl at a McDonald's in Brooklyn. At first, Berry claimed, "I'm not going to tell y'all the skin color because it's not relevant." After delivering his description of the brutal attack, Berry asserted that "you can blame this problem on anything other than the root cause. But the reality -- and this is what makes people so uncomfortable with our show -- is this one fact that we are about to state. We have people living in our country who are savages. Absolutely, positively savages. To engage in this kind of behavior."

Listen:

Berry, who calls himself the "czar of talk radio," has a daily show on Houston's KTRH, an iHeartRadio radio station that airs on several other iHeartRadio affiliates around the country. He was No. 28 on Talkers Magazine's 2014 Heavy Hundred.

Berry has hosted several Republican politicians on his show including Sen. Ted Cruz (TX), who posted his interview with Berry on his Senate website, and current Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, who appeared on Berry's show while running for governor in 2013. In 2010, Berry interviewed former President George W. Bush.

Full transcript (emphasis added):

BERRY: I just posted a video. Four teens viciously beat -- four teen girls viciously beat another girl in a Brooklyn McDonald's as the crowd cheers. I'm not going to tell y'all the skin color because it's not relevant. And you have no idea who it would be. As a McDonald's full of people watches, four girls beat another girl so savagely. As one is pounding, another's pulling the hair, another's just taking -- stepping back and -- shot and step back, and a shot and step back, because she doesn't want to actually have to get hit. They get her on the ground, and they proceed -- I mean, it's -- they don't kick her like you would kick from -- you know, they don't have a six-inch draw back. They don't kick her like you're kicking an extra point. No, no, they size it up like they're trying to beat Tom Dempsey's record. They get a running start. Wham, into the body. And this girl -- I mean, in fairness to this girl, I doubt this is the first beat down she's had, because four of them are pounding on her, and she steadily -- just everything she can to hold her own. She's 15 years old.

Now, somewhere, somehow, you can blame this problem on anything other than the root cause. But the reality -- and this is what makes people so uncomfortable with our show -- is this one fact that we are about to state. We have people living in our country who are savages. Absolutely, positively savages. To engage in this kind of behavior.

You'll see the video. She's thrown to the ground. The girls kick her, stomp her, and they're calling her the B-word the whole time because somehow, you know, that -- it's important that you also say words when you're doing it. And then a whole McDonald's full -- they're loving it. She ends up -- she's cowering under a table. Finally, [at] some point, two dudes I guess felt like, "Well, I guess we better do something." They grab her and get her out of there, but it's probably 90 seconds, two minutes of just beating, just beating before it's done.

Community activist Tony Herbert said, "The tenacity of placing something on video, to shoot a young lady being beat down by six or seven young women is ludicrous in our community." Now, why they always got to bring Luda into this? He says, "The message has to be sent very clearly that this kind of violence will not be tolerated, whether in a mall or in restaurants, are [sic] those involved should turn themselves into authorities immediately."

The owner of the franchise, Paul Goodman, said, "This was a really horrible incident, but one thing that can water down the terrible vision everyone just watched is a 20-pack of delicious Chicken McNuggets with your choice of sauce, a small, medium, or large fry, and a soft drink. Violence is very sad, but McDonald's for lunch is always a happy decision. Black lives matter."

OK, maybe he didn't say that, but it would have been nice if he did. If maybe he had also stated that black lives matter. You know what's interesting is, you know, of course, you don't need to say, "White lives matter." Because white people don't walk up to white people, put a gun to their head, and blow them away. White people don't drive past the home of other white people -- or black people, for that matter -- white people don't drive past the home of other white people and shoot into the window, knowing there are children inside. White people don't walk into a McDonald's, and four, five, six, seven, eight, 10 of them beat the snot out of somebody for minutes on end. While everybody else cheers, hoots, hollers, and films it. WorldStar. Yeah.

You know why white lives matter? Because that's what white people believe. The dirty little secret is, black people don't believe that black lives matter.

"But Michael, the guy that works at my company, he's the general manager, and he's" -- that's not who I'm talking about. Chris Rock has made very clear there are different types of black people. And the general manager at your company, who's black and a super-nice guy, doesn't want to live amongst that either.

But we can't deny the influence that this subculture is having on our society. You can go and hide behind your gates. Y'all can hire a guard at night. But eventually, a Trayvon Martin's going to come walking through your yard, at night, on suspension from school. Because his dad has a good job, and he lives there. And he lives in a world of thuggery, and his dad doesn't. That's actually -- that was the case there. But he was a thug, who went to school with other thugs.

Posted In
Diversity & Discrimination, Race & Ethnicity, Inclusion Matters
Person
Michael Berry
Stories/Interests
State Media
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