Sexual Harassment at Fox News | Media Matters for America

Sexual Harassment at Fox News

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  • Newsmax is airing Bill O'Reilly's hot takes on Trump's State of the Union address

    Serial sexual harasser to give commentary on speech by man who has openly bragged about committing sexual assault 

    Blog ››› ››› PAM VOGEL


    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Conservative outlet Newsmax will be hosting disgraced serial sexual predator Bill O’Reilly to “provide in-depth analysis” of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address tomorrow night.

    Newsmax announced on January 29 that O’Reilly will provide “live analysis” for Tuesday’s address by Trump -- with whom he has much in common -- on its Newsmax TV channel. In its press release, Newsmax CEO and close Trump friend Chris Ruddy said that O’Reilly’s “frank, no-holds-barred analysis is needed in American media more than ever.”  

    O’Reilly has settled at least six legal claims related to workplace sexual harassment over the course of 15 years, including one extremely notable settlement with former Fox analyst Lis Wiehl amounting to a whopping $32 million.

    After O’Reilly departed from Fox News following The New York Timesinitial reporting on the settlements in April 2017, he was largely and rightfully relegated to recording audio and video clips in his home office for his personal website. And his handful of media appearances in recent months have illustrated exactly how little his “analysis” is needed.

    In September, O’Reilly sat down with former Today show host Matt Lauer -- with whom he also has much in common -- and personally attacked one of the women who came forward about his harassment.

    And, to underscore the complete moral bankruptcy of Fox News and Sean Hannity, O’Reilly has several times appeared on Hannity’s radio show and on his Fox News show, sometimes to launch similar attacks. O’Reilly even appeared in person in the studio at Fox News, possibly sharing a space with women who’d been subjected to his harassment. (Fox heavily promoted O’Reilly’s return to its airwaves with zero shame about the number of women who’ve suffered at the hands of the network.)

    According to Ruddy, who has openly and proudly discussed courting O’Reilly before and has given him airtime already, this is the man whose analysis America needs “now more than ever.”

    Meanwhile, several lawmakers are planning to bring guests at the State of the Union who’ve spoken out about sexual harassment and assault. Will O’Reilly have anything to say about them?

  • Report: Women at Fox News are "stunned" and "disgusted" after Rupert Murdoch's dismissal of sexual misconduct at the network

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    According to a HuffPost report, “current and former female Fox News employees” were left “stunned, disgusted and ‘hungry for justice’” after Fox News executive chairman Rupert Murdoch’s comments downplaying the sexual harassment culture at Fox as “all nonsense.”

    Murdoch said during a December 14 interview with Sky, that the reported complaints about rampant sexual harassment at Fox News were “all nonsense” and reflected only “isolated incidents.”

    According to HuffPost many of the women who said they faced harassment at Fox were outraged by the comments. Ten women, both current and former employees, explained that Murdoch’s comments, “not only diminished the scandal that has plagued the network for over 17 months, it also virtually erased a flood of reports, terminations, forced resignations and settlements.”

    From HuffPost:

    Current and former female Fox News employees say they are stunned, disgusted and “hungry for justice” after media mogul Rupert Murdoch on Thursday dismissed allegations of sexual misconduct at the network as “nonsense” outside of a few “isolated incidents” with former Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes.

    [...]

    For this story, HuffPost spoke with 10 current and former female Fox News staffers, all of whom are or were on-air talent and say they have faced harassment or assault by current and former Fox News executives and on-air talent. They said the comment by Murdoch, who controls the Fox News Channel along with his two sons Lachlan and James through 21st Century Fox, not only diminished the scandal that has plagued the network for over 17 months, it also virtually erased a flood of allegations, terminations, forced resignations and settlements.

    [...]

    “I have had to put up with a hostile work environment for years, and now I’m told that it doesn’t exist by a man who doesn’t have to walk these halls every day? I’m hungry for justice,” said one woman who is part of the network’s on-air talent.

    “Hey Rupert - stop with the lies or we’ll go public with the truth. All of it. Including about the talent and executives you still employ who have harassed us and don’t give a damn about workplace respect - only money,” said a woman who was previously a prominent member of Fox News’ on-air talent. “How much will it take before you actually start caring about your female employees? Is your 52 billion enough? Are we really going to clean house now?”

    Murdoch’s comment directly contradicts the public relations strategy of Fox News and 21st Century Fox, which has been to diligently tell reporters the era of Ailes, who died this year, and host Bill O’Reilly is over. Instead, the press reps say, Fox News has ushered in a new era of corporate responsibility and a workplace free of hostility and retaliation.

    [...]

    “I’m contacting a lawyer tomorrow,” said one Fox News host. “I’m sick of this shit."

    Murdoch’s claim that harassment was limited to former Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes is demonstrably false, with allegations and settlements against Bill O’Reilly, Eric Bolling, Geraldo Rivera, and others coming to light since Ailes’ departure.

  • Rupert Murdoch says Fox News harassment stopped with Roger Ailes. He couldn't be more wrong. 

    Blog ››› ››› PAM VOGEL


    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Fox News executive chairman Rupert Murdoch reportedly said in a Sky interview that the network’s ongoing culture of sexual harassment was actually “all nonsense” and consisted simply of “isolated incidents.” Murdoch further asserted that the harassment at Fox was only perpetrated by former chairman and CEO Roger Ailes, and “there’s been nothing else since then.”

    Ailes was first publicly named for serial harassment in July 2016 when former Fox host Gretchen Carlson filed a lawsuit detailing how Ailes and Steve Doocy -- the current co-host of Fox & Friends -- made “sexually-charged comments” and were “sexist and condescending” toward her, respectively. The lawsuit also said Ailes made “demands for sex as a way to improve her job standing.” At least 25 women have come forward with stories of Ailes’ misconduct and harassment. Ailes resigned 2 weeks later. Ailes’ pattern of behavior, spanning at least a decade, seems far worse than a series of “isolated incidents.”

    What’s more, since Ailes’ departure on July 21, 2016:

    • The New York Times reported that (now former) Fox News host Bill O’Reilly and/or Fox News parent company 21st Century Fox had made at least six settlements for sexual misconduct -- including one for an astounding $32 million.
    • Fox suspended and conducted an internal investigation into Fox Business host Charles Payne after frequent Fox guest Scottie Nell Hughes reported that Payne had coerced her into a years-long relationship “under threat of reprisals." Payne was later cleared by the internal investigation, but is now named in a lawsuit from Hughes alleging rape and retaliation by Payne.
    • Fox News suspended, then “part[ed] ways amicably” with co-host Eric Bolling amid an investigation into claims he sent “unsolicited photos of male genitalia to current and former female colleagues at the network.”
    • Newsweek wrote about public reports of misconduct by Fox News co-host Juan Williams when he worked at The Washington Post. Fox News hired him years after the harassment claims were public.
    • A video of Bette Midler’s interview with Barbara Walters in 1991 resurfaced in which Midler described Fox News’ Geraldo Rivera assaulting her. Midler shared the video herself, and reiterated her story, also saying Rivera never apologized. The video’s resurfacing coincided with Rivera publicly defending reported harassment and assault by former NBC host Matt Lauer. The following day, Fox News said it was “troubled” by Rivera’s comments and Rivera later tweeted apologies about his statements, as well as a (sort-of) apology to Midler.

    So it sure seems like there’s been some other things since Ailes left!

    This isn’t the first time lately Fox has tried to congratulate itself on handling sexual harassment complaints lately. It’s just the most bizarre.

  • Geraldo Rivera, accused of sexual assault, has a history of downplaying sexual misconduct

    ››› ››› DINA RADTKE & GRACE BENNETT

    A recently resurfaced 1991 interview between Barbara Walters and actress Bette Midler included Midler's revelation that Fox News correspondent Geraldo Rivera reportedly sexually assaulted her at one point in the 1970s. This episode, for which Midler says Rivera has never apologized, typifies the disgraceful way the long-time Fox star has dealt with sexual harassment and assault throughout his career.

  • Sean Hannity's extensive history of undermining women who report sexual misconduct and defending the men accused

    Blog ››› ››› ANDREW LAWRENCE, JULIE ALDERMAN & DINA RADTKE


    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Fox News host Sean Hannity has become a reliable ally for powerful men accused of sexual assault and harassment, regularly using his platform to discredit women who report sexual misconduct and cast doubt on their complaints. Here is a look back on the ways Hannity has attempted to undermine these women and defend the men who have been reported.

    Roy Moore

    Eight women have said Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, a former judge of Alabama Supreme Court, sexually harassed or assaulted them, or had relations with them, when they were teenagers. The Washington Post first reported on November 9 that Leigh Corfman was 14 years old when Moore made sexual advancements toward her, and a number of women have since come forward with similar claims.

    Hannity: Many women who report sexual harassment “will lie to make money.” [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity: “Then you have false allegations that are made, and -- how do you determine? It's ‘He said, she [said].’" [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity: “How do you know if it's true? How do we -- what's true? What's not true? How do you ascertain the truth?” [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity: “We do have Ten Commandments. One of the commandments is ‘Thou shalt not bear false witness.’ We know human beings break, with regularity, the other nine commandments. Did they break this one?” [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity: “But then also, are there false allegations? And when it's ‘he said, she said’ or whatever, how do you tell the difference?” [Premiere Radio Networks, Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity invoked the Duke Lacrosse team case; Michael Brown, who was shot by a white cop in Ferguson, MO; George Zimmerman, who fatally shot Trayvon Martin; and Freddie Gray, who was killed in police custody to suggest there’s a history of accusers lying. [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity: The “swamp,” “the sewer,” and the “establishment” are out to get Moore. [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Hannity: The Wash. Post “hates anything Republican, anything conservative.” [Media Matters, 11/9/17]

    Roger Ailes

    In July 2016, former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson filed a lawsuit against Roger Ailes, the now-deceased former Fox News CEO, alleging sexual harassment and retaliation against her when she would not have “a sexual relationship with him.” An additional 25 women also came forward with similar accusations. Reports later detailed startling revelations of Ailes’ attempts to cover up his sexual misconduct by spying on employees and silencing his accusers.

    Hannity to Carlson: “Why did you stay after such ‘harassment’ asking for more airtime?” [Twitter, 7/13/16]

    Hannity about Carlson: “Why did [Carlson] send handwritten notes with smiley faces asking for more airtime after the ‘alleged’ traumatic incident?” [Twitter, 7/13/16]

    Hannity attacked accusations levied by Carlson as coming from a “publicity seeking” attorney. [Twitter, 7/9/16]

    Hannity: “Hundreds of woman (sic) at Fox that I talked to” said all allegations against Ailes are “BS.” [Twitter, 7/9/16]

    Hannity: “I have spoken to many woman (sic) who work at Fox that have the most amazing stories of how kind Roger is to them.” [Twitter, 7/9/16]

    Hannity to Gabriel Sherman who reported on Ailes: “U r an Ailes and Fox stalker.” [Twitter, 7/13/16]

    Donald Trump

    In 2016, at least 20 women accused then-candidate Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, including 12 nonconsensual physical encounters. In October 2016, The Washington Post reported on a video clip in which a hot microphone caught Trump bragging to Billy Bush, then of Access Hollywood, “in vulgar terms about kissing, groping and trying to have sex with women.”

    Hannity shrugged off accusations against Trump, arguing, “King David had 500 concubines for crying out loud!” [Fox News, Hannity, 10/7/16]

    Hannity suggested that one of Trump’s accusers may have “welcome[d]” the sexual assault.  [Media Matters, 10/13/16]

    Hannity mocked one of Trump's accusers: “Donald Trump groped me on a plane. It was all right for the first 15 minutes, but then he went too far.” [Media Matters, 10/14/17]

    Hannity on Trump accusers: “Just saying ‘help’ would solve the problem.” [Media Matters, 10/20/17]

    Hannity called accusations of sexual assault against Trump “an attempt to neutralize the WikiLeaks revelations,” referring to the stories generated from hacked Democratic emails.  [Media Matters, 10/13/16]

    Bill O’Reilly

    On April 1, The New York Times reported that former Fox News host Bill O’Reilly and 21st Century Fox, Fox News’ parent company, paid out at least $13 million in settlements with five women who said O’Reilly harassed them.

    Hannity gave O’Reilly a platform on his shows multiple times to attack the women who reported him. [Media Matters, 9/26/17, 10/5/17]

    Hannity hosted disgraced former Fox host O’Reilly after he was fired from the network. [Media Matters, 9/25/17]

    Clarence Thomas

    In 1991, Anita Hill, who worked as a former aide to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas during his time at the Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, “submitted a confidential statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee alleging that Thomas had sexually harassed her 10 years earlier,” according to CBS News. At least two other women also accused Thomas of sexual assault.

    While interviewing Thomas, Hannity referred to his accusers as “those that systematically went about destroying you.” [FoxNews.com, 10/3/07]

    Hannity implied that Thomas was “an innocent man” who had had “his reputation destroyed forever.” [Premiere Radio Networks, The Sean Hannity Show, 11/10/17]

    Hannity has praised Thomas for “giving one of the most powerful defenses” against sexual assault accusations. [Fox News, Hannity, 11/10/17]

    Herman Cain

    In 2011, at least two women reported that Herman Cain, who was at the time a candidate in the Republican presidential primaries, had sexually harased them during his tenure as the head of the National Restaurant Association in the 1990s.

    Under a screen graphic that read “Herman hysteria,” Hannity questioned whether the charges were “politically motivated,” and badgered an accuser for “staying in the car” with Cain after she says she was harassed. [Media Matters, 11/11/11]

    Hannity sought to discredit accusations against Cain and Justice Clarence Thomas, parroting their characterization of the charges as a “high-tech lynching.” [Politico, 11/10/11]

    Hannity on Cain’s press conference denying sexual harassment accusations: “You would think this is going to end it.” [Media Matters 11/9/11]

    Bill Shine

    After Ailes was ousted in August 2016 amid mounting sexual harassment allegations, Fox News promoted Bill Shine to co-president of the network. As senior executive vice president, Shine had reportedly “played an integral role” in covering up sexual harassment claims, including those against Ailes. Shine had a role in pushing “women into confidential mediation [and into] signing nondisclosure agreements in exchange for their contracts to be paid” as well as in establishing a “counter-narrative” to discredit Carlson. He later resigned after reports surfaced that he was cited “in at least four lawsuits” that accused him of ignoring, dismissing, and even concealing sexual harassment allegations against Ailes.

    Hannity: “Somebody HIGH UP AND INSIDE FNC is trying to get an innocent person fired.” [Twitter, 4/27/16]

    Hannity: If Shine is fired, “that’s the total end of the FNC as we know it.” [Twitter, 4/27/16]

    Hannity: “#Istandwithshine.” [Twitter, 4/27/16]

  • CNN hosted an astounding and heartbreaking town hall about sexual harassment last night

    Blog ››› ››› PAM VOGEL

    Hours after at least three new reports of sexual misconduct by high-profile men were published, CNN’s Alisyn Camerota hosted a powerful town hall conversation on sexual harassment in America. CNN’s decision to devote an hour of prime-time television news to lifting up survivor voices and engaging in thoughtful conversations with a live audience is commendable, and it’s the sort of thing viewers ought to see more often on cable news.

    CNN’s town hall, titled Tipping Point: Sexual Harassment in America, was a model for the ways national news commentary can address a cultural moment by providing the public with facts and context, while also approaching a tough subject with responsibility and empathy.  

    It began with discussions with law professor Anita Hill, actress Jessica Barth, former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson, and former Rep. Mary Bono (R-CA) -- all women who have reported sexual harassment by men in the public eye.

    Barth told The New Yorker last month about a 2011 incident in which Harvey Weinstein demanded she give him a naked massage during a business meeting. She is also currently pursuing charges against producer David Guillod for sexual assault. Barth shared with a national television audience her decision to come forward publicly:

    ALISYN CAMEROTA: Why do you think that so many people are reluctant to now talk about this in this sort of public forum?

    JESSICA BARTH: It’s scary. I think there’s a lot of fear that comes with it, as what we just read about Harvey Weinstein and his ties with the [private intelligence firm] Black Cube. There’s a lot of fear. There’s shame with speaking out, and I think part of the process in moving forward is to try to alleviate that shame. I think women who have a story and need to speak out can look at the media right now -- I don’t know how it’s going to be in the future -- but right now it seems to be that the media is a powerful tool in getting justice and for these perpetrators to get consequences.

    Hill, who testified in 1991 that Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her, spoke about her hopes that the current #MeToo moment would lead to greater examination of systems that allow for serial sexual harassment and to a better public understanding of sexual harassment happening every day in all industries:

    CAMEROTA: Professor, from where you sit, 26 years later, after your testimony, do you feel like we’re at a tipping point right now?

    ANITA HILL: I absolutely do. You know, I’ve been in this for 26 years now, and I’ve seen stories come and go, and some of them are quite powerful. I’ve seen movements come and go, and some are quite powerful. I’ve not seen something like this. And I’m hoping that not only will it bring lasting change, but I’m really hoping in two areas, in particular, that change comes. One, that we start looking at how harassment and harassing behavior is enabled, and all the, really, structures and people who are complicit in making sure that harassment either continues or gets disguised. And that’s one of the things that we can clearly learn from the Harvey Weinstein story -- that every day there are revelations about who was helping him and who was covering it and who was being used to attack women who came forward to accuse.

    The other thing that I hope is that the believability factor gets transferred, and that it gets transferred to people, again, outside of Hollywood, but also to women who have been marginalized on this issue for years. Part of the response to me had to do with my race. There are people who are not believed, not because their stories aren’t true or credible, but because there’s a certain kind of skepticism that comes with all kinds of identity factors, whether it’s sexuality or race or class. And so we tend to think about Hollywood, and I want us to understand that this is -- sexual harassment, sexual assault is something that happens to women of all races, all ages, all sizes, all backgrounds, religions. And until we can believe all women, every woman’s voice has value, none of us, really, will be seen as equal.

    Hill’s words reflect the larger theme of the CNN town hall: Workplace sexual harassment is an all-too-common experience that transcends class, race, politics, and industries. For every woman like Gretchen Carlson or Anita Hill who was harassed by a powerful man and who spoke up and then lived through, in an incredibly public way, the world’s sometimes heartening and often heartbreaking reactions, there are countless other people whose painful stories will remain unheard.

    Camerota’s later conversations with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), activist Tarana Burke (who started the #MeToo movement), and others drove home this point. Questions from audience members -- often activists, some who had experienced sexual harassment themselves -- also underscored this message.

    A town hall, rather than a multiperson panel of pundits, was a great public service to viewers, in particular those who may have experienced sexual harassment in the past. If one tuned in and didn’t see her experience reflected in Carlson, perhaps she would in Burke, or in an audience member.

    Or perhaps she would see herself in the moments of this town hall that felt like conversations I have every day with my friends -- moments in which Camerota and Carlson acknowledged their camaraderie as women who experienced harassment and silencing at Fox News. Or in which Gillibrand described an incident of harassment she’d experienced and the audience reacted with recognition and empathy. Or in which Camerota closed out the show by sharing one of her own sexual harassment experiences and bringing on stage the woman who helped her when she reported it -- moments for which I am particularly grateful as a woman and a survivor, as well as a media researcher.

    Tipping Point: Sexual Harassment in America may have itself illustrated a tipping point in media: a time when a major news network spends an hour of prime time listening to the voices of activists and survivors and mostly women.

  • Nine reasons why no one should hire Bill O’Reilly 

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    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Conservative media outlet Newsmax, headed by close Trump friend Chris Ruddy, has confirmed to Politico that it’s exploring hiring former Fox News host and serial sexual predator Bill O’Reilly. It's unbelievable we have to say this, but it’s a terrible and morally bankrupt idea. Here are nine reasons why:

    Shouldn’t that be enough?

  • ABC News invited Brian Kilmeade onto This Week and it was a total disaster

    ABC invites sexist Fox News host to spout nonsense about Russian collusion, and they failed to confront him about sexual harassment

    Blog ››› ››› NINA MAST


    Brian Kilmeade / Twitter

    Fox host Brian Kilmeade appeared on a panel discussion during the October 29 edition of ABC’s This Week, where he was invited to spout falsehoods about the Trump-Russia dossier. Kilmeade was not, however, included in This Week's discussion of sexual harassment, despite his network -- and his own show's -- high-profile culture of sexual harassment.

    Kilmeade has a history of not-so-smart commentary; but, more importantly, he's a Trump sycophant with an affinity toward pro-Trump propaganda. So it’s no surprise that Kilmeade used his appearance to attempt to scandalize reports that the Clinton campaign retained an opposition research firm for the partly verified Trump-Russia dossier. Right-wing media, including Kilmeade's show Fox & Friends, have worked to try to discredit special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, which, it was recently reported, has filed the first charges in connection with his team’s probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

    In addition to being a Trump shill with a disinterest in facts, Kilmeade is also a toxic misogynist at a network with an infrastructure that enables serial sexual harassment and who has a pervasive history of degrading women on air. In 2014 Kilmeade said of former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice assaulting his wife on an elevator, “The message is, take the stairs.” During another broadcast in 2014, Kilmeade introduced his female colleagues by saying, "Let's see if the girls have clothes on.” He continued: "If you're wearing something, please get naked. That goes for you too ladies." Kilmeade last year defended Trump against allegations of sexual harassment, falsely claiming that “none of” his accusers “are vetted.” And, notably, Kilmeade's former co-host Gretchen Carlson experienced extensive harassment and sexism during her time on Fox & Friends, including when in 2012, she walked off the set after Kilmeade remarked, “Women are everywhere. We’re letting them play golf and tennis now.” From Bloomberg Politics:

    Kilmeade’s appearance comes amid mounting allegations of sexual harassment by women in Hollywood, Congress, and the news media (including his employer Fox News). ABC’s This Week even featured a panel discussion of these developments, but Kilmeade was not a participant on that panel. Just yesterday, Media Matters explained the importance of confronting Kilmeade over his employer’s toxic culture of sexual harassment.

    Kilmeade isn’t the first misogynistic Fox News host to appear on This Week. Earlier this year, ABC scheduled noted racist and sexist Eric Bolling for a panel discussion. Bolling, formerly a co-host of The Five and The Specialistsleft the network in September for reportedly sending unsolicited explicit pictures of himself to multiple female colleagues. Media Matters warned ABC about Bolling’s history before his appearance as well.

  • The only defensible reason to have Brian Kilmeade on ABC's This Week is to ask him about sexual harassment at Fox News

    Kilmeade routinely says dumb things and has a long history of misogyny

    Blog ››› ››› NINA MAST


    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Fox & Friends co-host Brian Kilmeade, who has a history of making inept and degrading commentary, has inexplicably been invited to appear on ABC’s This Week on Sunday. The only defense for this invitation would be if the show is planning to discuss the culture of sexual harassment rampant in the media, particularly within Fox News, during the segment. Instead, the interview appears to be a part of the promotional tour for a book Kilmeade co-authored about a 45-minute battle during the War of 1812.

    Explosive reports of sexual harassment in Hollywood and at major news networks have dominated the news cycle this month. Just in the past few days, new revelations have surfaced about Kilmeade’s employer, Fox News, attempting to cover up allegations of sexual harassment against former Fox host Bill O’Reilly and bully women who spoke out against him. Fox has spent only minutes addressing the issue on air.

    There is no excuse to not ask Kilmeade about the toxic culture of sexual harassment that plagues the network that employs him, and in which he has personally participated. Kilmeade has a history of degrading women on Fox & Friends, a show he currently co-hosts with Steve Doocy and Ainsley Earhardt. Additionally, Kilmeade co-hosted Fox & Friends with former Fox host Gretchen Carlson who said in a complaint that co-host Steve Doocy "created a hostile work environment" and "engaged in a pattern and practice of severe and pervasive sexual harassment."

    Kilmeade is a misogynist and an embarrassment to the television news industry. Rather than give him an opportunity to advertise his book for free, ABC has a responsibility to ask Kilmeade tough questions about his participation in the culture of sexual harassment and sexism Fox News appears committed to preserving.