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Timothy Johnson

Author ››› Timothy Johnson
  • Don’t believe anything NRATV says

    The National Rifle Association's media outlet sent a pro-censorship message on social media and then went ballistic when people called it pro-censorship

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    NRATV, the National Rifle Association’s media operation, caused a stir on Twitter Thursday afternoon after sending a tweet that read, “It's time to put an end to this glorification of carnage in pursuit of ratings because it's killing our kids. It's time for Congress to step up and pass legislation putting common sense limitations on #MSM's ability to report on these school shootings."

    The tweet immediately generated outrage, which is understandable given that it appeared NRATV was promoting the notion that Congress ought to limit how the press can report on gun violence. NRATV, however, had taken itself out of context. The tweet was promoting a video narrated by NRATV host Colion Noir that ultimately concluded that such action by Congress would be wrong.

    Viewers could be forgiven for not sitting through the four-minute video given its painfully bad logic. It essentially equated Congress passing a law to limit how the press could cover shootings to Congress passing a law that regulates gun ownership. This is of course nonsensical given that rights protected by the Constitution are regulated in different ways, something that Noir, a law school graduate, should know.

    Prohibiting the press from reporting on shootings would constitute prior restraint, which would violate the First Amendment. Regulations on firearms, however, are typically permissible under the Second Amendment.

    The 2008 landmark Supreme Court decision District of Columbia v. Heller found that the Second Amendment protects the right of law-abiding individuals to have a handgun in the home for the purpose of self-defense. The ruling means that total gun bans are unconstitutional. However, many other regulations are permissible. As Heller’s majority opinion, written by conservative Antonin Scalia, stated, “Like most rights, the right secured by the Second Amendment is not unlimited.”

    Federal courts have repeatedly upheld laws banning assault weapons, for example. According to the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, “courts across the country have rejected the overwhelming majority of Second Amendment challenges initiated since Heller,” finding that myriad regulations comport with the Second Amendment right.

    This is all unimportant to NRATV, which crowed about the controversy and was clearly pleased with the result of its dishonest ploy. Noir wrote on Twitter, “I hate to humble brag but My recent  video just exposed how our mainstream media refuses to watch a 4min video in its entirety before reporting on it and pushing their agenda.” Apparently without irony -- given that NRATV took itself out of context -- NRATV’s Twitter account promoted a tweet from The Washington Times that read, “NRATV host Colion Noir enraged critics on Thursday who were eager to use an out-of-context tweet on de facto media control as a serious argument.” During the May 25 broadcast of NRATV, host Grant Stinchfield said of the media, “We here at NRATV set a trap, and they got caught,” adding that it "borderlines on criminality when it comes to the way they abuse the First Amendment."

    Promoting obviously false information is a tactic at NRATV, which has fabricated congressional testimony during its broadcasts to attack its political opponents and even once quoted a satire article published by the NRA’s magazine that was clearly labeled “fiction” as if it were serious in order to encourage people to vote for Donald Trump on Election Day.

    Chillingly, NRATV has actually supported anti-First Amendment measures as part of its pro-Trump efforts, particularly when it comes to the freedom of the press and the right to assemble. While branding itself as a news source, NRATV clearly does not act in good faith and should be thought of less as a legitimate journalism operation than as a propaganda outlet.

  • Alex Jones dons a clown mask and makes anti-gay comments while ranting about Rep. Eric Swalwell

    Jones punched a computer screen displaying Swalwell’s face during 27-minute tirade

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Alex Jones repeatedly called Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) “Eric Swallowwell” and punched a computer screen displaying Swalwell's face after he became angry that the Democratic congressman had argued for stronger gun laws during a Fox News appearance.

    Jones displayed bizarre behavior (even for him) throughout the 27-minute video posted to his YouTube channel, including donning a clown mask, repeatedly analogizing restricting firearms following mass shootings to the prospect of all men being forced to remove their penises if one man commits rape, and telling a fellow Infowars host, “If you don’t chop your balls off and put them in a jar, you’re a rapist.” (Jones said in the video that he was not intoxicated.)

    With gun policy in the news again following another school rampage, Swalwell appeared on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News show on May 21, where he argued for restrictions on assault weapons and other restrictions on firearms.

    Jones’ YouTube channel posted his response video the evening of May 22, after Jones’ normal broadcast, with the description “Alex Jones lays out the truth and hypocrisy behind Democrat Eric Swallowwell and his gun confiscation agenda.” Jones has also previously depicted men as gay to disparage them, regardless of their sexual orientation.

    While wearing a clown mask and affecting an accent, Jones repeatedly called Swalwell “Swallowwell” and made nonsensical claims about gun regulation:

    During his rant, Jones walked up to a computer displaying Swalwell’s face and said “look at this little” before punching the computer, apparently breaking it:

    He also entered the Infowars studio where War Room host Owen Shroyer was working, confronting Shroyer with comments about removing his penis and testicles:

    Toward the end of the video, Jones encouraged his supporters to target Swalwell with homophobic harassment on social media, saying, “I think everybody should start tweeting hashtag 'swallowswell' on this video.” Jones routinely uses social media platforms to push anti-LGBTQ bigotry.

    Jones' anti-gay commentary is also often mixed with violent rhetoric. In April 2017, Jones said that Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) “looks like the archetypal cocksucker” and is a “fairy” before threatening to beat Schiff’s “goddamn ass.”

  • NRA President-elect Oliver North smears Parkland survivors as criminals

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Incoming National Rifle Association President Oliver North, a former Fox News contributor and a national security aide in the Reagan administration, claimed that survivors of the February school shooting in Parkland, FL, are engaged in “intimidation and harassment and lawbreaking” in their advocacy for stronger gun laws.

    North, who was chosen president of the NRA by the group’s board of directors earlier this week, made the comments in an interview with The Washington Times.

    North commented on activism by survivors of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, saying they were involved in harassment, intimidation, and illegal activities. He did not provide any evidence for his claim. From the Times:

    He said the young survivor-activists who have emerged as representatives for gun restrictions — and as fierce opponents of the NRA — are getting swept up by a broader propaganda machine.

    “What they did very successfully with a frontal assault, and now intimidation and harassment and lawbreaking, is they confused the American people,” he said. “Our job is to get the straight story out about what happened there, and to make sure that kind of thing doesn’t happen again because the proper things are being done with the advocacy of the NRA.”

    Unlike the Parkland activists, North does know something about criminal activity. While serving in the Reagan administration, he was a central figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, which involved the U.S. secretly selling arms to Iran, and was convicted of three felonies for his role in it. North’s convictions were later vacated, although in 1994, a judge revoked his permit to carry a concealed gun in public, citing North’s “conviction for crimes involving moral turpitude.”

    North also said that the NRA was receiving threats and that a “cyberwar” was being carried out against the organization, and he compared the NRA to victims of the Jim Crow era:

    Mr. North said the NRA is now the victim of “civil terrorism” after vandals splashed fake blood on the Virginia home of a top NRA official and other opponents aimed personal “threats” at NRA leaders and members.

    “They call them activists. That’s what they’re calling themselves. They’re not activists — this is civil terrorism. This is the kind of thing that’s never been seen against a civil rights organization in America,” he said.

    “You go back to the terrible days of Jim Crow and those kinds of things — even there you didn’t have this kind of thing,” he said. “We didn’t have the cyberwar kind of thing that we’ve got today.”

  • The Air Force is running a recruitment ad for its special forces on Alex Jones’ YouTube channel

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    The U.S. Air Force is running recruitment ads on the YouTube channel of toxic conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.

    Media Matters observed an Air Force ad on May 8 that ran on a video posted to Jones’ channel the previous evening:
     

    Clicking on the ad led to a video posted on the YouTube channel of U.S. Air Force Recruiting, the description of which reads, “Special Ops Airmen are the Air Force’s elite ground combat force. They’re trained and equipped to engage with enemy combatants and high-value targets.”

    The ad's placement on the video means that Jones’ operation is receiving taxpayer money via YouTube’s advertising platform.

    After Jones spread conspiracy theories about both the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida and the survivors of the attack, CNN reported that many advertisers whose ads were running on Jones’ videos contacted YouTube to ensure they stopped, with some advertisers telling CNN that they had been unaware it was happening. Since CNN’s report, Media Matters has documented ads on Jones’ channel from the National Rifle Association and from a joint fundraising committee operated by the Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign.

    Jones routinely engages in violent rhetoric and calls high-profile tragedies false flag events that he says are orchestrated by the government or nebulous globalist forces. Perhaps most infamously, he called the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting an “inside job” and a “giant hoax,” along with making other false claims about the attack. He has faced multiple defamation lawsuits in recent months for spreading falsehoods about innocent people and most recently was sued by three Sandy Hook parents.

    There’s seemingly no limit to the number of conspiracy theories Jones will push. He's even made false claims about the Air Force. During his May 3 broadcast, Jones implicated the Air Force and other branches of the military in a supposed plot by the United Nations to ignite a race war to overthrow the U.S. government and seize control of the country:

  • Disgraced Iran-Contra figure Oliver North to become NRA president

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Oliver North, a central figure in the 1980s Iran-Contra arms dealing scandal, will become the NRA’s president during the next few weeks, according to a report from CNN’s Dana Bash:

    North’s ascendancy to the presidency is a deviation from the group’s standard succession for the position. In recent years, NRA presidents have served two-year terms. Current president Pete Brownell, a gun, ammo, and accessory retailer, was elected in 2017, meaning that he will leave his term a year early.

    Additionally, for the past several terms, after serving two years, the NRA president has been succeeded by the group’s first vice president. For example, Brownell was first vice president during the term of NRA President Alan D. Cors between 2015 and 2017. Cors had served as first vice president during Jim Porter’s two-year term, which began in 2013.

    A statement released by the NRA confirming North will become president noted that “to devote his full time and energy to his family business,” Brownell would not seek re-election. The statement did not explain why Brownell is leaving before his term expires.

    It is also unclear whether the change in succession will change the role of the president; NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre has far more control over the organization's direction.

    North is a current member of the NRA board of directors, with a term that expires in 2019, and is also the co-host of a show on the NRA’s media operation NRATV. He has also been a longtime contributor for Fox News but will leave that position effective immediately, according to the NRA statement.

    Along with his involvement in the Iran-Contra arms dealing scandal -- for which his convictions for several felonies were overturned in 1990 -- North has a history of using inflammatory rhetoric and has been enmeshed in other controversies:

    • During a 1993 GOP fundraising dinner that proceeded North’s failed run for Senate, North “told the crowd that he tried to telephone [Bill] Clinton, but the White House switchboard wouldn’t let him through until he disguised his voice with a lisp,” according to the Williamson Daily News. When asked to apologize by an LGBT group, North responded, “If it angered some subset, that’s their problem.”
    • During a 2010 appearance on Fox News, North argued that repealing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” would lead to pedophiles being admitted into the armed forces. North also wrote a Fox News opinion piece in which he argued that, by repealing the policy, Obama would succeed where Adolf Hitler and other dictators failed in destroying the U.S. military.  
    • North claimed in 2010 that Obama had a “core philosophy of being anti-American.”
    • North’s charity Freedom Alliance was accused from the left and right of misappropriating funds meant for scholarships.
    • Writing at The Patriot Post in 2010, North recounted a conversation he had with a man who told him, “I believe slavery was evil. But the way our government is acting today, I think I understand why the South seceded.” North said that the man’s comments were “strong stuff” before comparing Obama to President James Buchanan.
    • During a 2011 speech at the NRA annual meeting, North said, “We need a commander-in-chief who cares more about the troops he leads than his birth certificate,” referring to Obama addressing the smear that he wasn’t born in the United States.
    • In 2012, North was accused of plagiarism after language from a Vietnam veteran’s memoir appeared in his column for Fox News without attribution.
    • While appearing on Fox News in 2012, North called a remote Afghan region “Injun country.”
    • During a 2013 appearance on NRA News, North called the Civil War “the War Between the States,” a Confederate term.
    • As recently as 2013, North was still falsely insisting that Iraq's late President Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.
    • The Intercept reported in 2017 that North and Blackwater founder Erik Prince were in talks with the Trump administration about the creation of a “a global, private spy network” that would serve “as a means of countering ‘deep state’ enemies in the intelligence community seeking to undermine Donald Trump’s presidency.”
  • A gun that looks like a cellphone isn't the only tone deaf thing on display at the NRA annual meeting

    Blog ››› ››› CYDNEY HARGIS & TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    The National Rifle Association is holding its annual meeting in Dallas, TX, this year. The event kicked off on May 3 with an evening banquet and is now in full swing with a three-day exhibition at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center. In addition to exhibiting guns, ammunition, gun accessories, tactical gear, and other merchandise, the event features speeches, seminars, and workshops.

    The preeminent event at the annual meeting will be the NRA-ILA Leadership Forum, which will begin at noon CST on May 4. (The Institute for Legislative Action, or ILA, is the NRA’s lobbying wing.) NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre, chief lobbyist Chris Cox, and national spokesperson Dana Loesch are scheduled to speak at the forum. Elected officials speaking at the event include President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and Texas Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, and several conservative media figures will round out the lineup. The following day will feature the event’s official “Annual Meeting of Members,” where the election results for the NRA's board of directors will be announced and other NRA business will be conducted.

    There are many notable facts about the event, but none highlight the disconnect between the NRA and public sentiment on firearms regulation and the role of guns in society more than a pistol featured in the exhibition hall that can be disguised to look like a cell phone:



    The pistol is manufactured by Ideal Conceal, whose website says, “Smartphones are EVERYWHERE, so your new pistol will easily blend in with today’s environment.” A demonstration video shows that the weapon can be pulled from a pocket, unfolded, and fired in just seconds.





    The display comes less than two months after Stephon Clark was shot and killed by police in Sacramento, CA, after the cops mistook the cellphone he was holding for a gun. As Jaclyn Corin, a survivor of the mass Parkland, FL, shooting, noted on Twitter, the existence of the firearm could be used as a pretext to justify police shootings of unarmed people:

    Here are some other highlights of the NRA’s annual meeting:

    Speeches, seminars, and other events

    • Trump’s will give a speech at the meeting for the fourth year in a row. The Kremlin reportedly sought to use the 2016 annual meeting as a venue to attempt to make “first contact” with Trump’s presidential campaign.

    • The meeting will have a “Women’s Leadership Forum” and the keynote speaker will be white nationalist favorite Tucker Carlson, a Fox News host. This isn’t the first time a Fox host has keynoted the event; Sean Hannity was the featured speaker in 2013.

    • The NRA announced that pro-Trump media figures Diamond and Silk will speak at the event’s NRA-ILA Leadership Forum. The announcement came just days after the duo appeared before Congress and made false statements under oath.

    • NRA board member Ted Nugent will be attending the meeting. Nugent has made several controversial statements this year including saying the Parkland shooting survivors are liars who “have no soul.” Nugent has been a regular figure at NRA annual meetings, where he’s talked about shooting former Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) and called then-President Barack Obama “Osama Obama” and offered to “pilot” a boat to send him to Kenya.   

    • Discredited gun researcher John Lott will give a seminar on “false and misleading claims that will be made to advance gun control this year” ranging from “claims about Australia’s and the UK’s gun laws to … the true costs of expanded background checks to mass public shootings and gun-free zones.” His group, the Crime Prevention Research Center, will also have a booth.  

    • During the meeting’s “Youth Day,” the NRA will introduce children to firearms by using “nerf guns.” The NRA was previously criticized for pushing an ineffective program to teach kids gun safety and for rewriting children’s fairy tales to include pro-gun narratives.

    • The NRA has stated that no guns will be allowed in the arena during appearances by Trump and Pence at the behest of the Secret Service, undermining the NRA’s frequent claims that so-called “gun-free zones” imperil people’s lives, enable mass shootings, and draw terrorists.

    The exhibition hall

    • Smith & Wesson, the maker of the assault weapon used in the Parkland, FL, school shooting, will exhibit several products in the “Featured Product Center & Demo Area.” Smith & Wesson has donated more than $1 million to the NRA.

    • Aagil Arms, a sister company of TuffZone and the “official manufacurer (sic) of the Ted Nugent Signature Series upper assemblies,” will have a booth on the exhibit floor that will feature a line called “Ted Nugent’s American Spearchucker Series AR15-style Upper kits,” which reference an obscure racial slur.

    • Trump-supporting Liberty University, conservative Hillsdale College, and right-wing think tank the Heritage Foundation -- entities with no direct connection to the gun industry  -- will all have booths at the meeting.

    • U.S. Border Patrol will also have a booth at the meeting, even though members of NRA leadership routinely demean and attack immigrants.  

    • There will likely be a lot of men. Eighty-five percent of attendees last year were men, according to information posted on the NRA annual meeting website for potential exhibitors.

    • According to The Texas Tribune, the NRA is “getting a free ride” for this event and will not pay the usual $410,000 rent for the space.

  • Alex Jones claimed Facebook would ban him if he kept using an anti-trans slur. He hasn't stopped, and he's still on Facebook.

    Blog ››› ››› BRENNAN SUEN & TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Alex Jones has claimed several times that Facebook executives told him he would be banned from the platform for his use of the anti-trans slur “tranny.” Despite supposedly receiving these warnings, Jones has not backed down and continues to use the disparaging term on his show, which he streams on Facebook Live. Jones is a right-wing conspiracy theorist and ally of President Donald Trump with a history of anti-LGBTQ extremism.

    Jones frequently targets the transgender community on his show, often using slurs to refer to transgender folks, dehumanizing their existence, and spreading vile rhetoric about them. He once claimed that transgender women may be gay men who want to “go pick up more guys” by getting “breast implants” and trying to “doll [their] hair up,” and he has also said that being transgender and having a baby is like him deciding that he is a “50-foot, red, purple, striped giraffe” that “give[s] birth to leprechauns.” In other segments, Jones has said that accepting transgender people is a slippery slope to “brain chips” and, on multiple occasions, he has tried to disparage former first lady Michelle Obama by saying she is transgender and may have committed murder to cover it up.

    Jones frequently uses the dehumanizing slur “tranny” to refer to transgender people. In fact, during his November 13 broadcast, Jones said a “high level” employee at Facebook contacted him and purportedly told him that if he continued to use “tranny,” he would be banned. (The video is still available on Facebook with the title “Facebook Forbids Infowars From Saying ‘Tranny’ or ‘Drag Queen.’”) Facebook community guidelines prohibit hate speech “that directly attacks people based on their … sex, gender, or gender identity.”

    Despite the supposed warning, Jones continues to use the slur. He said “tranny, tranny, tranny, tranny, tranny, tranny, tranny, tranny” during his November 20 broadcast, and, on December 19, he said, “James Brown never died, folks, he just became a tranny. That tranny’s called  Maxine Waters,” referring to the Democratic member of Congress from California. Jones seems to be trying to taunt Facebook by repeatedly talking about his supposed conversations with its executives and his continued use of the slur:

    Writing for The Advocate, Parker Molloy described the violence and hatred tied to the slur:

    It’s a term tied to a history of violence, oppression, anger, and hate. It’s a term I’ve been called by those who wish to harm me. And frankly, it’s a term many trans women, like slain New Yorker Islan Nettles, hear immediately prior to falling victim to physical violence.

    As Dana McCallum wrote in a 2012 article for Medium, “It’s a word people use to make trans people feel like shit, to reject our humanity, and to isolate us from the rest of the world. It’s a word people scream when they are beating us, strangling us, shooting us, setting us on fire, and dumping our bodies in ditches.”

    At a time when the amount of violence against and killings of transgender folks -- particularly trans women of color -- is growing, Jones’ use of the slur is particularly jarring.

    Video by John Kerr. 

  • Kelly Jones speaks out: My marriage to Alex Jones was a “domestically violent situation”

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Alex Jones' ex-wife Kelly Jones said the prominent conspiracy theorist was violent toward her during their marriage.

    Jones described her “nightmare” marriage during a wide-ranging April 3 interview on the David Pakman Show in which she talked about an ongoing custody dispute with her ex-husband, his threats last year against Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), and his rise as a prominent backer of President Donald Trump. The couple divorced in 2005.

    Kelly said that she and her ex-husband met after she moved to Austin, TX, and was working for a public access TV station where they had the same producer. While initially drawn to him because he was “different than anybody I had ever met,” she said that several years into the relationship, “suddenly I was living in a domestically violent situation completely isolated from all friends and family.”

    Citing what she described as her ex-husband’s “lack of control,” anger problems, and substance abuse issues, Jones said, “It was a nightmare to be with him, it was horrible, and especially towards the end it was awful, untenable.” Jones said she stayed in the relationship for as long as she did because she was in "a domestic violence cycle." But she said when she saw her children “starting to emulate” some of their father’s mannerisms, she concluded that “like a lot of domestic violence victims” she was “fooling” herself that “this isn’t having an effect on them.”

    Jones said that she is speaking out to help others who may be in similar situations, telling Pakman, “The reason why I’m coming out so hard, too, is I divorced Alex Jones. And everybody looked at me and gaslit me and said I was a liar and worse and treated me horribly, victim-shamed me when I came forward with serious concerns about abuse, and neglect, and other things.”

    “If that can happen to me with Alex Jones, there’s people back there all over Travis [County in Texas] and all over this country who don’t have the possibility of this kind of publicity because they didn’t divorce a notorious unwell person. But I did. Doesn’t that concern you, America, that this is happening in family court?”

    Two former employees of Alex Jones’ Infowars outlet recently filed complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging abusive behavior from Jones and other Infowars employees while on the job. He is currently embroiled in controversy over his attacks against student survivors of the February mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, and he is facing defamation lawsuits brought by individuals he or his outlet falsely identified as being involved in recent mass casualty events.

    Kelly Jones’ full interview is below:

  • The Trump campaign and the RNC are advertising on Alex Jones’ YouTube channel

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    The Trump Make America Great Again Committee -- a joint fundraising operation run by President Donald Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee -- is running a campaign advertisement on toxic conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ YouTube channel.

    Media Matters observed the ad just a day after Jones used his YouTube channel to depict survivors of the Parkland school shooting as members of the Hitler Youth:

    During the March 27 broadcast of The Alex Jones Show, Jones broadcast a video that dubbed a Hitler speech over Parkland survivor David Hogg’s speech at the March For Our Lives gun violence rally and depicted Parkland survivor Emma Gonzalez and other march participants as members of the Hitler Youth.

    Jones has been at the forefront of pushing conspiracy theories about survivors of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

    Jones also pushed conspiracy theories about the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting -- labeling it “a giant hoax,” “staged,” and “fake” -- and has called other mass shootings and national tragedies “staged” “false flag” events. (He often claims that contrary to official accounts, attacks and other mass casualty events are carried out by his political opponents.)

    Jones was an early Trump backer, and the president appeared on his show in December 2015 to praise Jones’ “amazing” reputation. Jones says he has been in touch with Trump during his presidency and brags that his communiques reach the president during his “executive time.”

  • The NRA is running ads on Parkland conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ YouTube channel

    UPDATE: The NRA’s media operation, NRATV, is also running ads on Jones’ channel

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    While many major brands are ensuring that their ads do not appear on conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ YouTube channel, the National Rifle Association is continuing to advertise with Jones.

    CNN reported on March 3 that it had “discovered ads on InfoWars' channels from companies and organizations such as Nike (NKE), Acer, 20th Century Fox, Paramount Network, the Mormon Church, Moen, Expedia (EXPE), Alibaba (BABA), HomeAway, Mozilla, the NRA, Honey, Wix and ClassPass.” Many companies that were running ads on Jones’ YouTube channel told CNN that they terminated the ads after being made aware of them.

    The NRA, however, is continuing to run ads, like this one that appeared before a video of NRA board member Ted Nugent’s February 26 appearance on Jones’ show:

    Jones has pushed conspiracy theories about numerous mass shootings, including calling the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School “fake” and a “giant hoax.” Since the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, last month, Jones has waged a campaign against several student survivors who have spoken out about gun violence, claiming that the students are “Democratic Party operatives” and are “scripted.”

    Jones has become a vocal supporter of the NRA since the gun group’s release of a 2017 ad that critics say was an incitement to violence against critics of President Trump. Following the Parkland shooting, Jones invited Nugent on his show to make an NRA membership pitch. This past weekend, Jones visited Nugent at his house; he says he will broadcast footage of that interview this week.

    UPDATE:

    NRATV, the NRA’s 24/7 online media outlet, is also running ads on Jones' channel. This ad featuring NRATV commentator Dom Raso was observed on March 6: