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White nationalism

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  • Media outlets are citing a hate group in reports about Trump's planned census change for 2020

    Blog ››› ››› ZACHARY PLEAT

    Media outlets are citing the anti-immigrant hate group Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) in reports about the Trump administration’s addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census, which experts say will jeopardize its accuracy.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has called CIS founder John Tanton “the father of the modern nativist movement” and designated his organization a hate group because it “churns out a constant stream of fear-mongering misinformation about Latino immigrants.” Also contributing to the decision to designate was CIS' “repeated circulation of white nationalist and anti-Semitic writers in its weekly newsletter and the commissioning of a policy analyst who had previously been pushed out of the conservative Heritage Foundation for his embrace of racist pseudoscience.” CIS personnel have a record of making racist commentary and portraying immigrants as dangerous criminals. Yet, all too often, media outlets treat CIS as a credible voice in immigration debates, and they frequently fail to identify either its anti-immigrant views or its white nationalist ties.

    This is happening again in reports regarding the Trump administration’s announcement that it will add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census. At least a dozen states oppose the move and have indicated they will sue the administration to prevent the question from being added, and census and civil rights experts have said adding such a question will reduce response rates from immigrants, jeopardizing the census’ accuracy. Yet CIS has defended the addition of a citizenship question, and news reports from both conservative and mainstream outlets are discussing the organization’s support of the Trump administration move.

    A Minnesota Star Tribune article quoted CIS, as did a column from the Boston Herald’s Adriana Cohen. D.C.’s ABC affiliate station WJLA (owned by the pro-Trump Sinclair Broadcasting Group) also cited CIS research, and ABC Radio’s D.C. affiliate WTOP briefly cited CIS’ defense of adding the citizenship question. Four different Fox News shows also cited CIS in their March 27 coverage of the census change: Happening Now, Outnumbered Overtime, The Daily Briefing, and Special Report. A March 28 FoxNews.com column defending the administration’s move linked to a CIS study. Fox host Laura Ingraham’s radio show hosted CIS Executive Director Mark Krikorian on March 27 to criticize Democrats’ response to the move, and Washington Examiner columnist Paul Bedard extensively quoted CIS to justify adding a citizenship question to the census.

    Only WTOP and the Star Tribune mentioned CIS’ agenda, saying simply that the group “pushes for decreased immigration” and has “advocated for tougher immigration regulations.” But those descriptors hardly inform voters about CIS’ problematic origins or its continuing associations with white nationalists and other bigots. Legitimate media outlets should not cite anti-immigrant groups as sources of unbiased information at all -- and if they do, they should clearly label them as such.

  • Sebastian Gorka was hired by a far-right media outlet. He still works for Fox News.

    Gorka is a conspiratorial bigot and frequent Hannity guest

    Blog ››› ››› NINA MAST


    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    Sebastian Gorka, former Trump aide, recently-hired Fox News strategist, and frequent Hannity guest, has been hired by Canadian far-right media outlet Rebel media. Gorka is just the latest bigoted commentator to be hired by a network equally known for its hateful anti-Muslim commentary and sympathy for white supremacists. He’s also still employed by Fox News.

    On February 1, Rebel media promoted the first episode of Gorka’s new and recurring segment for the network, “The Gorka Briefing.” In the video, Gorka claimed to “untangle” various narratives about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential elections, something he does regularly as a guest on Fox News. Just last night, Gorka appeared on Fox show Hannity, and helped host Sean Hannity further his long-standing campaign against the validity of the Russia probe when he accused former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton of colluding with Russia and the media of advancing a “false” narrative about the issue. Since August 2017, Gorka has appeared on Hannity 46 times, making him one of Hannity’s three most frequent guests, according to a Media Matters analysis.

    Gorka also briefly advised pro-Trump super PAC MAGA Coalition after he left the White House and, as The Daily Beast reported last night, was paid $40,000 for his work. The MAGA Coalition is a political group founded by “right-wing conspiracy theorists,” and was engaged in spreading the almost deadly “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory that falsely accused members of Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign of being part of a pedophilia ring operating out of a pizza parlor.

    Aside from Gorka’s penchant for conspiracy theories, he boasts a long history of bigoted and incendiary rhetoric, aimed at Muslims in particular, and has apparent ties to a Hungarian Nazi-allied group called Vitézi Rend. He was also reportedly fired from the FBI for his “over-the-top Islamophobic rhetoric” and was apparently ousted from his role in the Trump administration for partly the same reason.

    With his extreme anti-Muslim views and reported ties to a Nazi-allied group, Gorka may be a perfect match for Rebel media, an outlet that once employed someone who published a “satirical video” titled “Ten Things I Hate About Jews.” After the Canadian outlet lost several other high-profile contributors in the wake of its sympathetic coverage of the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, VA, it is now seeking to re-establish its brand and further expand its global platform of anti-Muslim ideology.

    In addition to hiring Gorka, the outlet recently hired former Daily Mail columnist turned far-right agitator Katie Hopkins. Most recently, Hopkins was apparently banned from South Africa for fomenting racial hatred while in the country reporting for The Rebel. But she is perhaps best known for her shameless anti-Muslim rhetoric. Hopkins once called for the use of “gunships to stop migrants,” actively supported a mission to disrupt humanitarian rescues of refugees in the Mediterranean Sea, and floated the idea on Fox News of putting Muslims in internment camps in the wake of the Manchester terror attack.

    Rebel media is also slated to hire extreme “Muslim reform” activist Raheel Raza, who has cheered Trump’s Muslim ban, is affiliated with SPLC-designated anti-Muslim hate groups ACT for America and The Clarion Project, and serves as a senior fellow for The Gatestone Institute, whose founder is a major funder of anti-Muslim activism.

    Despite Gorka’s long history of bigotry and, now, open affiliation with a far-right outlet, one of America’s top cable networks still considers him a trusted "strategist." Gorka’s joint employment is just the latest evidence that Fox News has no interest in distancing itself from the network’s most extreme voices.

  • Alex Jones: “You got a lot of black folks who are acting like predators out attacking white people”

    Jones: “If you're a racist black person and shoot your mouth off at Donald Trump, he's going to slap your ass right back”

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    From the January 12 edition of Genesis Communications Network’s The Alex Jones Show:

    ALEX JONES (HOST): I've had long conversations with Trump, obviously on air, but off air and I'm not going to give any inside baseball about Trump, but let’s just say the grass is always green on the other side and Trump does not dislike black people. And they just better watch out for when the time comes for the ace in the hole, because the ace is -- there's some black aces down in the hole, folks. And I'm going to leave it at that. That’s why people like, “You know he’s out of control and had a bad issue before, he’s an interesting businessman.” That’s why Don King loves him and everything else. Donald Trump, the big secret is, really likes black people. And what he likes is interesting, alive, aggressive people. He doesn't like black thugs or white thugs or anything like that, but Donald Trump likes black people and there's a big ace in the hole waiting from the times that the president has not been married.

    [...]

    JONES: All the black people loved Donald Trump, he was in more rap songs, more stuff, they all loved him until he ran for president and then they were told he's the worst guy since Hitler. All the black people liked Trump because of all the contracts and all the money they made with him and how he brought them in. Kanye West thinks he's the best thing since sliced bread. But Hillary Clinton says black people are superpredators and are bad and you know what, you got a lot of black folks that are acting like predators out attacking white people. It’s all over the news. Liberals go, “Yeah, I walked out of the thing and six black guys beat me up saying I was a Trump supporter, I voted for Hillary.” And it's some gay white guy. But see, that’s the excuse to sit there and attack whoever you want. But if you're a racist black person and shoot your mouth off at Donald Trump, he's going to slap your ass right back. But it’s all a load of crap.

    Previously:

    Alex Jones floats "reparations" and "travel advisories" for white people, citing fear of black-on-white crime

    Denver area “stabbing” that caused Alex Jones to issue a “travel advisory” for white people was a hoax

    Alex Jones: Protesting NFL players are “kneeling to white genocide”

    Alex Jones to “all the minorities” in America: “You live here, you get rich here, and then you piss all over it”

    Alex Jones is prepared to shoot people in a race war, but he wouldn’t enjoy it

  • Laura Ingraham retweeted a British neo-Nazi

    Mark Collett is a far-right British figure whose book has been endorsed by David Duke

    Blog ››› ››› BOBBY LEWIS

    Fox News host Laura Ingraham retweeted a video from a far-right British figure who is connected to David Duke.

    On January 7, Ingraham quoted a tweet alleging to show “what third world immigration does to Europe,” which included a video of trash and people apparently living on a city street. Ingraham added above the tweet, “Can anyone verify if this is really a video of Paris?”

    The person Ingraham retweeted, Mark Collett, is a former chairman of the youth division of the British National Party (BNP,) a far-right political organization in the United Kingdom. Collett was eventually dismissed from the BNP and arrested for death threats against his political rival, who was then the BNP’s leader. Collett has repeatedly collaborated with and received a book endorsement from former KKK leader and radio host David Duke. Collett once said that he admired Adolf Hitler, and has said that he considered AIDS a “friendly disease because blacks, drug users and gays have it.” He has also called asylum seekers “cockroaches” and accused Asian men of “go[ing] straight to the whites 'cos they are trying to destroy us and they are the racists.” Collett also campaigned in support of Brexit with his girlfriend, who has multiple Nazi tattoos.

    Several media figures called out Ingraham for the retweet, with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes asking if Ingraham was going to “share this one next,” quoting another Collett tweet with a video comparing refugees to racoons, and CNN’s Brian Stelter suggesting Ingraham focus on a story of rejoicing fans of the NFL’s Buffalo Bills “destroying everything in sight in Jacksonville.” 

    Ingraham’s retweeting of a neo-Nazi comes about two weeks after her primetime Fox News colleague, Tucker Carlson, approvingly tweeted an article from a white supremacist radio show that called the Holocaust “the biggest hoax of the 20th century.” Carlson “apologize[d]” for the tweet without acknowledging he linked to a white supremacist account. 

  • Alex Jones is hawking pro-Trump children’s book that indoctrinates them to white nationalism

    The book also teaches kids that sexually assaulting women isn’t a big deal

    Blog ››› ››› TIMOTHY JOHNSON

    Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones is selling a “limited edition” of a children’s book that depicts President Donald Trump as a cartoon bunny named Thump. The book promotes white nationalist imagery and makes light of the video of Trump admitting to sexually assaulting women and the national outrage that followed.

    The book, called Thump: The First Bundred Days, was written by a group of co-authors including Brett R. Smith, the creative director of the Steve Bannon-backed Clinton Cash: A Graphic Novel, and Timothy Lim, who has worked with Marvel, Lucasfilm, and Hasbro. The book is published by Post Hill Press, whose books are distributed by Simon and Schuster. 

    The online store of Jones’ conspiracy theory outlet Infowars is selling the book with an exclusive poster showing Jones and Thump and describes the product as “the perfect book for teaching your kids or reading through it for yourself!”

    Jones hosted Smith for a promotional interview on January 3, and flipped through the book, revealing some of its disturbing content.

    On one page that Jones showed, the text read, “Thump found friends in strange places and in all shapes and sizes. Such as the frogs that croaked ‘KEK!’ They were full of surprises!”

    The line is a reference to Pepe the Frog, an originally innocuous cartoon that was transformed into a talisman for white nationalism during the 2016 presidential campaign.

    The book also references a video released in October 2016 that showed Trump bragging about sexually assaulting women. Thump reads, “Thump was caught talking of grabbing all things pusillanimous. Protesters even made pink hats: their ire was unanimous.”

    Although pusillanimous is a synonym for cowardly, it’s a reference to Trump saying that he grabbed women “by the pussy.”

    During segments of the broadcast, which also featured far-right troll and “Pizzagate” conspiracy theorist Jack Posobiec, Smith explained, “We really wanted to come out with something fun and light, something that kids and adults, all Trump supporters could enjoy.”

    Jones lavished praise on the book, suggesting people donate copies to their local libraries (after purchasing them from Infowars), and saying, “This is genius.” Smith added that what’s “great about Thump as well is that parents can use Thump to talk to their kids about Trump, and they can say, ‘No, Thump is a good guy, he’s the hero that we need.’”

    Trump appeared on Jones’ show in 2015 to praise the conspiracy theorist’s “amazing” reputation. Since then, Jones has been a sycophantic supporter of Trump. He’s said he communicates with Trump and writes him memos, and most recently defended the president’s penis.

  • Far-right trolls and white nationalists defend Trump's anti-Muslim video retweets

    Blog ››› ››› NINA MAST


    Sarah Wasko / Media Matters

    On Wednesday morning, President Donald Trump retweeted three anti-Muslim videos posted by Jayda Fransen, the deputy leader of the far-right, ultranationalist Britain First political organization, who has previously been “found guilty of religiously aggravated harassment.” Trump’s retweets of three videos attempting to link Muslims to violent crime, one of which has been debunked and the other two of which lacked context, were praised by white nationalists and far-right ideologues on Twitter and by internet trolls on 4chan, 8chan, and Reddit message boards. At least one prominent fake news website also defended Trump’s retweets.

    Prominent white nationalist David Duke:

    Infowars’ Paul Joseph Watson:

    Far-right vlogger and identitarian movement supporter Peter Sweden:

    White nationalist podcast host James Allsup:

    White nationalist associate of Richard Spencer, Evan McLaren:

    White nationalist congressional hopeful Grant J. Kidney:

    White nationalist group Defend Europa:

    Anti-immigration hate website VDARE:

    A poster on 4chan’s “politically incorrect” message board: “Trump just went full alt right.”

    Another 4chan/pol/ user wrote, “PRAISE TRUMP,” calling the videos Trump shared “/POL/-TIER MUSLIM CHIMPOUT VIDEOS” -- an indication that the videos were extreme enough to have been promoted by 4chan users.

    One user on the 8chan/pol/ message board, in reference to Trump’s tweets, wrote, “I'm still not tired of winning. Sieg fucking heil.”

    And on the pro-Trump subreddit “/r/The_Donald,” one user shared the videos Trump retweeted and directed other users to an online tool that can be used to download the videos, likely to share them through different mediums.

    Fake news website Conservative Tribune praised Trump’s tweetstorm in a post, writing, “Refusing to cower to political correctness, President Donald Trump went rogue Wednesday, taking dead aim at radical Islamic terrorists and the violence they sow.”

  • UPDATED: White supremacist leader recently donated to Roy Moore’s campaign

    UPDATE: Roy Moore’s campaign returned donation from white supremacist leader

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    UPDATE: According to the Moore campaign’s pre-special election report -- which was filed after this post and received by the secretary of the Senate on December 1 -- Moore’s campaign returned Johnson’s contribution in October.

    William Johnson, a white supremacist leader who has called for the deportation of nonwhites, recently donated to the U.S. Senate campaign of Alabama Republican Roy Moore. Throughout his career, Moore has repeatedly associated with white nationalists.

    Moore is a right-wing pundit and twice-removed Alabama Supreme Court judge who holds extreme and toxic views on LGBTQ rights, religion, and environmentalism, among other issues. The Washington Post recently reported that Leigh Corfman said Moore molested her when she was 14 and he was 32. Three other women told the Post that “Moore pursued them when they were between the ages of 16 and 18 and he was in his early 30s.”

    Johnson, who openly refers to himself as a “white nationalist,” heads the American Freedom Party, which claims to represent “the interests and issues of White Americans and all Americans who support our mission.” He donated $250 to Moore’s campaign on September 20, according to the campaign’s October quarterly report.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center wrote that Johnson authored a book under a pseudonym in which he advocated "the repeal of the 14th and 15th amendments and the deportation of almost all nonwhite citizens to other countries. Johnson further claimed that racial mixing and diversity caused social and cultural degeneration in the United States." Johnson also regularly appears in white national media

    Johnson drew notice during the 2016 presidential campaign when the Trump campaign selected him as a convention delegate from California. He later resigned from that position and the Trump campaign blamed a "database error" for the selection. The campaign also accepted a $250 donation from Johnson, which it later returned after criticism. Johnson separately issued robocalls asking voters to support Trump because there is purportedly a “gradual genocide against” white people.  

    Moore has a long history of associating with white nationalists. For example:

    • Talking Points Memo reported that Michael Anthony Peroutka, a key Moore supporter, is “a hardline Confederate sympathizer with longtime ties to a secessionist group.”
    • BuzzFeed reported that Moore “once addressed the ‘semi-annual national conference’ of the Council of Conservative Citizens, the white supremacist group that alleged Charleston shooter Dylann Storm Roof cited as a formative influence in his online manifesto.”
    • The Huffington Post reported that Moore’s foundation also “accepted a $1,000 donation from a group founded by Willis Carto, a white supremacist, Nazi supporter and World War II vet who famously said he regretted fighting for the U.S instead of Germany.”
    • CNN reported that “pro-Confederate activists twice held events to commemorate Alabama's 1861 secession from the United States at the headquarters of the foundation led at the time by Roy Moore.”