The Washington Post | Page 28 | Media Matters for America

The Washington Post

Tags ››› The Washington Post
  • David Daleiden Is Not A Journalist

    Media Outlets Debunk CMP’s Fraudulent Claim That Its Work Is “Investigative Journalism”

    ››› ››› SHARON KANN

    Despite the indictment by a grand jury and numerous lawsuits over Center for Medical Progress (CMP) founder David Daleiden’s attempts to smear Planned Parenthood, right-wing media have claimed that CMP’s deceptively edited videos are “investigative journalism.” Other media outlets have rejected this claim, confirming that CMP’s videos are misleading, fraudulent, and, above all, not journalism.

  • Washington Post: North Carolina's Anti-LGBT Law Will Not Go Unpunished

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    Washington Post article reported on how the "disease" that is House Bill 2 (HB2), a new North Carolina law that requires transgender people to use the bathroom corresponding to the sex on their birth certificates, reflects a dire level of misunderstanding of LGBT people in general. According to the Post, the law's outright bigotry has stirred backlash from celebrities, lawmakers, and businesses, leading to serious economic problems for the state.

    The law was sparked by the "bathroom predator" myth that allowing transgender people to use the bathroom consistent with their gender identity could put people in danger. Despite the fact that that myth has been repeatedly debunked, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory did not hesitate to sign HB2 into law, following suit with similar legislation passed by Mississippi and Tennessee that permits discrimination against LGBT people. The law's passage represents a vast misunderstanding of LGBT people, which has sparked protests and boycotts to dismantle anti-LGBT legislation. 

    The April 12 article compiled the opinions of protesters who were shocked and disgusted by the law's blatant discrimination towards transgender people, one businessman reflecting that "it's a big sign of how uneducated America is." Despite right-wing media outlets denouncing these boycotts, the Postwriter showed optimism for change by highlighting the effectiveness in protesters' tactics, noting that "as in all other times when bigotry raises its hideous head, better angels will prevail":

    The law in question was hurriedly passed last month and signed by North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory (R) in response to what one state official called a restroom free-for-all, referring to sudden hysteria over the possibility of transgender individuals using the “wrong” restroom. How would anyone know? Will officials now post monitors at public restrooms to check birth certificates and human bladder-evacuation portals? This would be riotously funny if it weren’t so patently discriminatory.

    [...]

    “I feel like a traitor going to High Point, putting capitalism before human rights,” he said. “I don’t feel good about that, and I know it’s wrong.” Wooters isn’t only baffled by the bigotry of the legislation but also by whatever generates the fear behind it.

    “Why do people feel they have to be afraid? It’s a big sign of how uneducated America is.”

    Another local designer, Jamie Merida, owner of Bountiful, told me he decided to go if only to make his case to vendors that they have six months to straighten out this mess or he, too, will be off to Las Vegas next time.

    [...]

    Although North Carolina has been noted in recent years for its increasingly hard-right politics, it is still shocking that a state that boasts several of the nation’s top colleges and universities and is home to the famed Research Triangle, could codify what is so plainly a discriminatory law. In comments Tuesday, McCrory, feeling the pressure, softened his defense of the law but stopped short of opposing the provision on bathroom use by transsexual people. As in all other times when bigotry raises its hideous head, better angels will prevail. Either the courts will overturn the law or the state will come to its senses, if only for economic reasons.

  • Print Coverage Of The Gender Pay Gap Glosses Over Disproportionate Effects On Minority Groups

    Blog ››› ››› CRISTINA LóPEZ G.

    In their coverage of the gender pay gap during the week leading up to Equal Pay Day, print versions of three major newspapers largely failed to note that wage disparities are particularly acute for women of color and transgender women. Only one-third of the coverage pointed out that the pay gap is larger for women of color, and the coverage omitted any discussion of the pay gap faced by LGBT women.

    Equal Pay Day, which fell this year on April 12, marks how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned the previous year. Studies show that women make significantly less money than men over their lifetimes -- on average, a woman in the United States in 2014 made 79 cents for every dollar a man made -- but the gap can increase when other variables are factored in. Research from the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress demonstrates that disparities are larger for women of color. On average, African-American women earn 60 percent as much as their white male counterparts, and Latinas earn just 55 percent of what white men earn. A recent report by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) found that location, age, and education level all factor into pay disparity, and that at every level of academic achievement, women earn less than men.

    Media Matters analyzed pay gap coverage during the week prior to Equal Pay Day in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post, and found that the Post and the Journal each published two articles in print about the gender pay gap, and in each paper only once mentioned race and ethnicity as a factor in pay disparities. The Times, which also printed two articles about the pay gap, failed to mention race at all. The impact of the wage gap on LGBT women was not addressed at all in the analyzed coverage.

    LGBT women are invisible in coverage of the wage gap, despite the specific impact pay disparity has on them. Experts say that LGBT people -- specifically transgender women -- are more likely to be discriminated against in the workforce and, according to Raffi Freedman-Gurspan, policy advisor for the National Center for Transgender Equality, the issues surrounding wage disparity "are heightened for transgender people."

    Methodology

    Media Matters analyzed pay disparity-related coverage from April 5 to April 12 -- the week leading up to and including Equal Pay Day -- on the print editions of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post using the following search terms on Nexis and Factiva: "equal pay," "wage gap," "gender pay gap," "pay discrimination," "Latinas," "Hispanic," "Black," "women of color," "LGBT," "GLBT," "LGBTQ," "trans," "transgender," "gay," "lesbian," and "queer." Articles with incidental mentions of the wage gap or of pay discrimination outside of the United States were excluded.

  • What Media Should Know About The Anti-Choice Group Protest ABQ

    Meet The Group That Has A History Of Targeting Abortion Providers, Has Connections To Violent Anti-Choice Groups, And Is Now Feeding Misinformation To A Congressional Panel 

    ››› ››› SHARON KANN

    Following in the footsteps of the Center for Medical Progress (CMP), Protest ABQ is the latest anti-choice group feeding misinformation to Republicans on the Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives. Protest ABQ is a radical anti-abortion group with connections to Operation Rescue, an extremist group with a history of ties to anti-choice violence. Here is what the media should know about these groups, their efforts to mobilize violence against abortion providers, and their connections to Congress’ Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives.