Here are the QAnon supporters running for state legislatures in 2020

The QAnon conspiracy theory is rooted in the chan message boards. Here are 23 current or former state legislative candidates who embrace it.

QAnon state legislatures

Citation Molly Butler / Media Matters

Updates (last updated 10/16/20): This article has been repeatedly updated with more state legislative candidates and to note the status of the candidates following primary elections. We will continue to update it as we find more state legislative candidates supporting the conspiracy theory.

Editor’s note (8/7/20 and 10/16/20): This article originally cited Ballotpedia in identifying a personal social media account for Brian Redmond. After we published his entry, Ballotpedia removed the link to the social media account mentioned here as belonging to Redmond. Evidence still suggested the account was likely his, and reporting from Mainer has since confirmed it is him.

Multiple supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory, which got its start on far-right message boards, are running campaigns for state legislatures around the country in 2020. These candidates are in addition to dozens of congressional candidates who have also embraced the conspiracy theory.

The conspiracy theory, which revolves around an anonymous account known as “Q,” started on far-right message board site 4chan and later moved to fellow far-right message board site 8chan, which has since relaunched as 8kun. (Beyond the QAnon conspiracy theory, 8chan/8kun has been linked to multiple instances of white supremacist terrorism, including the 2019 massacre in El Paso, Texas.)

The “Q” account’s claim -- and the conspiracy theory’s premise -- is that President Donald Trump was working with then-special counsel Robert Mueller to take down the president’s perceived enemies, the “deep state,” and pedophiles. Multiple adherents to the conspiracy theory have been tied to acts of violence, including multiple murders and attempted kidnappings, and an FBI field office released a memo in May 2019 that listed QAnon as a potential domestic terrorism threat.

Currently, there are 23 known candidates who have endorsed or given credence to the conspiracy theory or promoted QAnon content. Among them:

  • Three candidates are incumbents, in Florida, Tennessee, and Connecticut, and all of those incumbents have secured a spot on the ballot in November.
  • Twenty-one candidates in total have secured a spot on the ballot in November: three from Minnesota, two each from Arizona, Washington, New York, and Maine, and one each from Indiana, Tennessee, Nevada, New Mexico, New Hampshire, North Carolina, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, and Florida.
  • Nineteen candidates are Republicans, one is an independent, one is a member of New York’s Conservative Party, one is both a Republican and Conservative Party member, and one is a member of Hawaii’s Aloha Aina Party.

Below is the list of 2020 state legislative candidates who have endorsed or given credence to the conspiracy theory or promoted QAnon content, divided into sections for 1) candidates who have secured a spot on the ballot in November; 2) candidates whose primaries are still upcoming; and 3) candidates who are no longer running.

Candidates on November ballot

Dion Bergeron (Indiana)

Dion Bergeron is a Republican candidate running for District 9 of the Indiana House of Representatives. Bergeron, who is also a former congressional candidate, was selected by the Porter County Republican Party by caucus to run for the seat and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. During his congressional campaign in March, Bergeron accepted an endorsement from a QAnon super PAC, responding on Twitter, “I’m honored and humbled by your official approval.” He also wrote the QAnon hashtag and the QAnon slogan -- “#wwg1wga” (short for “where we go one, we go all”). On his congressional campaign Facebook page, he wrote, “My license plate says THANQ on the Indiana ‘In God We Trust' plate. On my side windows are stickers that proclaim Where We Go One, We Go All.”

Dion Bergeron QAnon Twitter

Eric Berthel (Connecticut)

Eric Berthel is an incumbent Republican member of the Connecticut State Senate running for reelection in District 32. He advanced after the Republican primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. Berthel has a sticker with the QAnon slogan on his car. He told Connecticut Public Radio that while he does not “believe in many of the wild eyed theories reportedly associated with the QAnon movement about pedophile conspiracies or satanic cults,” he does believe in “stopping corruption in politics, holding government accountable and protecting individual freedoms,” which “the movement has come to represent.” He added that QAnon “has allowed for people who have previously felt disconnected from public policy and government to be part of the conversation.” Berthel later released a statement saying his “failure to look into the movement more deeply, which I take full responsibility for, led me to overlook the extreme views of the movement which I don’t subscribe to and find abhorrent.”

Eric Berthel QAnon

Kevin Bushey (Maine)

Kevin Bushey is a Republican candidate running for District 151 of the Maine House of Representatives. He won the Republican primary by default on July 14 and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. As reported by researcher Marc-André Argentino and by The Daily Dot, Bushey is a member of a YouTube-based “QAnon church” called Omega Kingdom Ministries, where, as The Daily Dot described it, he “spends nearly an hour every Sunday morning deciphering QAnon drops, Twitter threads, memes, and updating viewers on ‘military operations.’” He has also repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan.

Video file

Citation From a May 3, 2020, YouTube video

Rob Chase (Washington)

Rob Chase is a Republican candidate running for District 4 of the Washington House of Representatives. He came in the top two in the nonpartisan blanket primary on August 4, which means under Washington election law, he will appear on the ballot in November's general election. According to The Pacific Northwest Inlander, Chase -- who is also a former congressional candidate -- on Facebook has “repeatedly directed followers to check out QAnon posts or podcasts, writing in January that ‘Q is posting again. This will be a week to remember,’ and in April that ‘Q is all hopped up tonight.’” The outlet also reported that Chase has posted the QAnon slogan and wrote a blog post that described QAnon as part of a “‘battle that's been going on at least a few hundred years’ with ‘patriots’ like Trump trying to thwart ‘an ongoing plan by the Deep State to destroy America, because that is the only way they can establish a Global New World Order.’” Chase also told the outlet that he was “intrigued” by QAnon and “open to it,” though “he doesn't consider himself an outright QAnon supporter” despite his previous comments.

Rob Chase QAnon Facebook

Citlalli Johanna Decker (Hawaii)

Citlalli Johanna Decker is an Aloha Aina Party candidate running for District 5 of the Hawaii House of Representatives. She advanced from her party’s primary by default on August 8 and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. Decker has repeatedly posted the QAnon slogan on Facebook (including writing it out fully), and has also posted it on Instagram. She has also run Instagram ads with the QAnon slogan, and her Facebook page “likes” a QAnon page.

Citlalli Johanna Decker QAnon Facebook ads

Justin DeFillippo (New York)

Justin DeFillippo is a Conservative Party candidate running for District 23 of the New York State Senate. He advanced after the Conservative Party primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. On July 23, DeFillippo wrote on Facebook, “Condemn the hate groups not the #Q.” He’s used the hashtag “#Q” multiple times, alongside the QAnon hashtag and a hashtag for the debunked Pizzagate conspiracy theory. He has also posted the QAnon slogan on Instagram. DeFillippo has additionally run a Facebook ad with “#Q” and the QAnon slogan.

Justin DeFillippo Facebook QAnon

John Cardiff Gerhardt (Nevada)

John Cardiff Gerhardt is an independent candidate running for District 12 of the Nevada State Assembly, and he will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. In his Twitter account profile (which has since been suspended), Gerhardt wrote he is “PRO: Qanon.” He has posted the QAnon hashtag and QAnon slogan on Facebook, writing, “Once you learn the truth, there’s no going back to sleep.” In a Ballotpedia candidate survey he filled out, Gerhardt also wrote, “I stand with Q. I go 1 with all.”

John Cardiff Gerhardt QAnon Twitter profile

Mark Gilham (California)

Mark Gilham is a Republican candidate running for District 22 of the California State Assembly. He came in second in the nonpartisan blanket primary on March 3, which means under California election law, he will appear on the ballot in November's general election. Gilham’s campaign site features the QAnon slogan.

Mark Gilham QAnon

Gary Heyer (Minnesota)

Gary Heyer is a Republican candidate running for District 50B of the Minnesota House of Representatives. He won the Republican primary by default and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. Heyer, who is also a former independent congressional candidate, previously called himself an “Independent #QPlan Candidate” in his Twitter profile. In a since-deleted tweet in December, he posted a video of himself apparently outside of a church and next to a sign with “Q” on it, saying he was “inviting all of the churchgoers to partake in the great awakening.” Heyer has also posted a QAnon coronavirus conspiracy theory video on Facebook.

Gary Heyer QAnon Facebook

Amber Krabach (Washington)

Amber Krabach is a Republican candidate running for District 45 of the Washington House of Representatives. She was the only listed Republican running in the district’s nonpartisan blanket primary on August 4, which means under Washington election law, she will appear on the ballot in November's general election. Krabach has repeatedly tweeted the QAnon hashtag and the QAnon slogan, including tweeting that she “follow[s] Q” and that “Q is confirmed.”

Amber Krabach QAnon Twitter

Susan Lynn (Tennessee)

Susan Lynn is an incumbent Republican member of the Tennessee House of Representatives running for reelection in District 57. She won the Republican primary by default on August 6 and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. On her Facebook page, her cover photo is a QAnon flag. She has also repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan, and The Daily Dot reported that she has retweeted “a short video of a man taking an ‘oath of enlistment’ to be a ‘QAnon digital soldier.’”

Susan Lynn QAnon Facebook

Melissa Moore (Minnesota)

Melissa Moore is a Republican candidate running for District 46B of the Minnesota House of Representatives. She advanced after the Republican primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. On Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, Moore has written the QAnon slogan along with other QAnon-related hashtags like “#GreatAwakening” and “#DoItQ.” She also told The Associated Press that she likes “following” QAnon and that “it’s an exciting movement that opens up our minds to different possibilities of what’s going on, of what’s really happening in our world today.”

Melissa Moore QAnon Twitter

Sev Palacios (North Carolina)

Sev Palacios is a Republican candidate running for District 21 of the North Carolina State Senate. He advanced after the Republican primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. Palacios’ Twitter profile includes the QAnon slogan.

Sev Palacios QAnon Twitter

Brian Redmond (Maine)

Brian Redmond is a Republican candidate running for District 148 of the Maine House of Representatives. He won the Republican primary by default on July 14 and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. On Redmond’s personal Twitter account (since suspended), the profile image had the text “Q’s Army” and the QAnon slogan. The account had also repeatedly tweeted the QAnon hashtag and the QAnon slogan. Redmond has since told Mainer that the conspiracy theory is “an opportunity to wrestle back control of our government from subvertists and treasonists.”

Brian Redmond QAnon Twitter profile

Anthony Sabatini (Florida)

Anthony Sabatini is an incumbent Republican member of the Florida House of Representatives running for reelection in District 32. He advanced after the Republican primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. In May, he tweeted a link to a site that collects “Q” posts.

Anthony Sabatini QAnon Twitter

Suzanne Sharer (Arizona)

Suzanne Sharer is a Republican candidate running for District 18 of the Arizona State Senate. She won the Republican primary on August 4 running unopposed and thus will be on the ballot in November's general election. She has tweeted the QAnon hashtag and the QAnon slogan. On Facebook, she has posted a QAnon video while asking, “Have you heard of Q?”

Suzanne Sharer QAnon Facebook

Mark Szuszkiewicz (New York)

Mark Szuszkiewicz is a Republican and Conservative Party candidate running for District 46 of the New York State Assembly. He advanced after the Conservative Party primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. Szuszkiewicz has repeatedly posted the QAnon slogan and other QAnon hashtags on Instagram, including hashtags pushing the Pizzagate conspiracy theory. He has also repeatedly tweeted multiple QAnon hashtags.

Mark Szuszkiewicz QAnon Twitter

Cynthia Taylor-Hollandbeck (New Hampshire)

Cynthia Taylor-Hollandbeck is a Republican candidate running for District Rockingham 28 of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. She won the Republican primary by default on September 8 and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. On Taylor-Hollandbeck’s personal Twitter account -- which her campaign Twitter account has identified as hers -- she has repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan and QAnon hashtag. She also posts on Gab, a social media platform favored by white nationalists, where she announced her campaign as an effort to “sav[e] my State from an out-of-control Governor” and “helping Trump get re-elected,” while “still supporting #Q” and “#QTeam.”

Cynthia Taylor-Hollandbeck Gab QAnon

Joe Thalman (Minnesota)

Joe Thalman is a Republican candidate running for District 49B of the Minnesota House of Representatives. He advanced after the Republican primary was canceled and will be on the ballot in November’s general election, according to Ballotpedia. According to the Star Tribune, Thalman said the QAnon slogan out loud at a candidate forum, saying, “We’re seeking truth and justice and where we go one, we go all.”

Joey Tiano (New Mexico)

Joey Tiano is a Republican candidate running for District 39 of the New Mexico State Senate. He won the Republican primary on June 2 and thus will be on the ballot in November’s general election. Tiano has tweeted the QAnon slogan more than once.

Joseph Tiano QAnon Twitter

Justine Wadsack (Arizona)

Justine Wadsack is a Republican candidate running for District 10 of the Arizona State Senate. She won the Republican primary on August 4 running unopposed and thus will be on the ballot in November's general election. As The Daily Dot has reported, Wadsack -- who is also a former congressional candidate -- has tweeted and written out the QAnon slogan more than once. Despite that, Wadsack has since denied to the Phoenix New Times that she supports QAnon, saying that “everything about politics intrigues me, all sides.”

Justine Wadsack QAnon Twitter

Candidates whose primaries are still upcoming

No known QAnon-supporting candidates have upcoming primaries.

Candidates no longer running

Melissa Ackison (Ohio, lost primary)

Melissa Ackison was a Republican candidate who ran for District 26 of the Ohio State Senate. She was defeated in the primary on April 28. On Facebook, while linking to a video series that pushes the Pizzagate conspiracy theory, Ackison wrote, “For the hundreds of people sending messages asking me what QAnon is, here’s the video series.” In response, someone commented, “You have a BIG fan base with the Q underground Melissa...Q rocks!!!,” to which Ackison wrote, “I know,” along with flag and fist emojis.

Melissa Ackison Facebook2

Bobby Jeffries (Pennsylvania, dropped out of race)

Bobby Jeffries was a Republican candidate who ran for District 106 of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and dropped out before the primary, according to Ballotpedia. Jeffries, who was also a former congressional candidate, has repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan and in a since-deleted tweet wrote, “#QAnon for the win!”

Bobby Jeffries QAnon tweet