QAnon Congress 2022
Molly Butler / Media Matters

Research/Study Research/Study

Here are the QAnon supporters running for Congress in 2022

The QAnon conspiracy theory was linked to the Capitol insurrection. Here are 45 congressional candidates who have embraced it.

Update (last updated 8/30/21): This article has been repeatedly updated with more congressional candidates and details.

Multiple people who have expressed some level of support for the QAnon conspiracy theory, which got its start on far-right message boards, are running for Congress in 2022.

The QAnon conspiracy theory, which revolves around an anonymous account known as “Q,” started on far-right message board site 4chan, later moving to fellow far-right message board site 8chan, which has since relaunched as 8kun. (Beyond the QAnon conspiracy theory, 8chan/8kun has been linked to multiple instances of white supremacist terrorism, including the 2019 massacre in El Paso, Texas.) Some supporters of QAnon have been tied to violent incidents and participated in the January 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol, and multiple government agencies have issued internal warnings of domestic terrorism regarding supporters of the conspiracy theory.

Among these 45 candidates who have previously endorsed or given credence at some level to the conspiracy theory or promoted QAnon content:

  • Twelve are from Florida, eight are from California, four are from Texas, three are from New York, two each are from Arizona, Nevada, New Jersey, Illinois, and Ohio, and there is one each from Maryland, Rhode Island, Oregon, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia, and Colorado.
  • One of the candidates, in Florida, is running for a special congressional election being held in January 2022.
  • Forty-two are Republicans and three are independents.

Below are the 2022 congressional candidates who previously endorsed or gave credence to the conspiracy theory or promoted QAnon content, organized by state and then by last name in alphabetical order.

  • Arizona

  • Josh Barnett

    Josh Barnett is a Republican candidate running in Arizona’s 6th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in Arizona’s 7th Congressional District in 2020. In July 2020, in response to an NBC News report about Twitter’s announcement that it would take action against the spread of QAnon content on the platform, Barnett tweeted, “Weird to be so paranoid about something that is not real, right?” On both Facebook and Instagram, he has shared posts with QAnon hashtags. Despite those posts, Barnett claimed in August 2020 that he believes QAnon is “nonsense” and “not even a real thing” and that one of his posts with QAnon hashtags was just “retweeting the article.”

  • Josh Barnett QAnon Facebook
  • Daniel Wood

    Daniel Wood is a Republican candidate running in Arizona’s 3rd Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Wood, in since-deleted tweets, had repeatedly mentioned the QAnon slogan -- “wwg1wga,” short for “where we go one, we go all” -- and used the hashtag “#TheGreatAwakening.” On Facebook, Wood has written “I do follow QAnon at times” because its supporters “believe in bringing power back to the people.”

  • Daniel Wood QAnon Twitter
  • California

  • Jamie Byers

    Jamie Byers is a Republican candidate running in California’s 4th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. In 2020, he tweeted the QAnon slogan at Trump.

  • Jamie Byers QAnon Twitter
  • Mike Cargile

    Mike Cargile is a Republican candidate running in California’s 35th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Cargile’s since-suspended Twitter account included the QAnon slogan and “#OathKeeper,” likely a reference to a far-right armed militia group. He had also tweeted and retweeted the QAnon slogan, and he responded “absolutely” to a user's tweet that “now's the time to get On Board” with QAnon. Cargile later released a statement about QAnon, claiming he had the conspiracy theory’s slogan in his profile because “it is the perfect sentiment for all Americans to have toward one another” and added that “we’ll see” regarding “actual ‘Q’ intel.”

  • Mike Cargile Twitter profile
  • Ignacio Cruz 

    Ignacio Cruz is a Republican candidate running for Congress in California (he has not yet made explicit which congressional district he will be running in). He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in California’s 19th Congressional District in 2020. Cruz has posted the QAnon slogan on his personal Facebook page and multiple times on his campaign Facebook page. He also ran a Facebook ad including the slogan. Cruz has also posted QAnon images.

  • Ignacio Cruz Twitter QAnon
  • Paul Gutierrez

    Paul Gutierrez is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in California. He has tweeted the QAnon slogan along with a video from a QAnon influencer promoting the conspiracy theory and a link to a video titled “Q Anon: Clinton House Fire Deliberate Act ‘To Flush Enemy Out.’”

  • Paul Gutierrez QAnon Twitter
  • Alison Hayden

    Alison Hayden is a Republican candidate running in California’s 15th Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. On her campaign Twitter account, Hayden has repeatedly retweeted content explicitly promoting QAnon, along with repeatedly tweeting the QAnon-connected hashtag “#GreatAwakening.” She has also tweeted the QAnon hashtag and the spinoff hashtag for the QAnon slogan, “#WWG1WGAWORLDWIDE.” On what Ballotpedia lists as her personal Twitter account (which her campaign account has previously tagged), she has tweeted the QAnon slogan and the hashtag “#GreatAwakening.”

  • Allison Hayden QAnon Twitter post
  • Peter Liu

    Peter Liu is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in California. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in California’s 15th Congressional District in 2020. On his since-suspended Twitter account, Liu had repeatedly tweeted the QAnon hashtag and QAnon slogan.

  • Peter Liu QAnon Twitter
  • Omar Navarro

    Omar Navarro is a Republican candidate running in California’s 43rd Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Navarro has tweeted the QAnon slogan, and he later told Insider “that he believes in ‘some things’ that ‘Q’ says, including the human trafficking trope.” He has also pushed the debunked Pizzagate conspiracy theory.

  • Omar Navarro QAnon Twitter
  • Buzz Patterson

    Buzz Patterson is a Republican candidate running in California’s 7th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. In April 2020, Patterson tweeted “yep” in response to a user asking if he “support[s] the Q movement.” Patterson later told Axios “that he does not recall sending the tweet about the theory and does not ‘follow or endorse anything he/she/them say’” and has more recently tweeted, “Q doesn’t exist. Never has.”

  • Buzz Patterson QAnon Twitter
  • Colorado

  • Lauren Boebert

    Lauren Boebert is an incumbent Republican member of Congress who is running for reelection in Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District. In 2020, she appeared on the online show Steel Truth, hosted by QAnon supporter Ann Vandersteel, who asked Boebert if she knew about “the Q movement.” Boebert responded that she was “very familiar with it” and said that while she did not focus on it a lot, she hoped that QAnon “is real because it only means America is getting stronger and better.” She also said that everything she heard about QAnon “is only motivating and encouraging and bringing people together, stronger, and if this is real, then it can be really great for our country.” Boebert also appeared that year on Patriots' Soapbox, which had been a major QAnon YouTube channel prior to being removed from the platform. She also appeared to have a YouTube account that subscribed to multiple QAnon channels. Despite her activity, Boebert later claimed, “I don’t follow QAnon,” and she said that “QAnon is a lot of things to different people.”

  • Florida

  • Darren Aquino

    Darren Aquino is a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 19th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Aquino has tweeted the QAnon slogan.

  • Darren Aquino QAnon
  • Vic DeGrammont

    Vic DeGrammont is a Republican candidate running in a special election for Florida’s 20th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. DeGrammont used to have the hashtag “#Q” in his Twitter profile, and he has also repeatedly tweeted “#Q” and repeatedly used the QAnon slogan.

  • Vic DeGrammont Twitter profile
  • Jake Philip Loubriel

    Jake Philip Loubriel is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Florida. An inactive Twitter account seemingly belonging to Loubriel has previously been critical of Q while framing Q and QAnon as legitimate and also repeatedly tweeting the QAnon hashtag and the QAnon slogan.

  •  Jake Philip Loubriel QAnon Twitter
  • Luis Miguel

    Luis Miguel is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Florida. He has tweeted the QAnon slogan and written, “If QAnon wasn’t problematic for the establishment, the social-media companies they control wouldn’t be banning it.” Miguel has since told a USA Today Network reporter that “he never reads the QAnon message board but stays abreast of its activities through secondary sources,” adding, “I would say many of the people who follow me have followed QAnon postings.”

  • Luis Miguel QAnon Twitter
  • Brian Perras

    Brian Perras is a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 12th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in California’s 29th Congressional District in 2020. Perras has tweeted a video promoting QAnon and has tweeted multiple times that “the storm is coming,” a likely reference to former President Donald Trump’s statement about a “calm before the storm,” which is central to QAnon lore. He has also tweeted that the late John F. Kennedy Jr. should be Trump’s vice president, referencing a belief pushed by some QAnon supporters that Kennedy Jr. is secretly still alive. He has also written that Trump will “become the 19th President,” a reference to the QAnon March 4 conspiracy theory

    Additionally, Perras has repeatedly called Hollywood celebrities “baby blood drinkers,” an apparent reference to the adrenochrome conspiracy theory among QAnon supporters that Democratic elites harvest that drug from children via torture. Perras has also written that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is involved with a “child slavery ring,” a claim tied to the Pizzagate conspiracy theory which itself has become incorporated into QAnon. He’s also claimed Democrats will be sent to Guantanamo Bay for punishment or even execution, which is also a part of QAnon lore.

  • Brian Perras QAnon Twitter video
  • Christine Quinn

    Christine Quinn is a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 14th Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. In October 2020, Quinn tweeted the QAnon slogan and an image of the letter Q. Quinn has since told a USA Today Network reporter that the tweet was “from our social media team” and “was tweeted without her approval or knowledge of what the hashtags meant,” adding, “I've never posted anything by QAnon. I don't even know who's behind it. ... I want to make it clear that I am not associated with QAnon.”

  • Christine Quinn QAnon Twitter
  • Anthony Sabatini

    Anthony Sabatini is an incumbent member of the Florida House of Representatives and a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 11th Congressional District. In May 2020, he tweeted a link to a site that previously collected Q posts.

  • Anthony Sabatini QAnon Twitter
  • Christine Scott

    Christine Scott is an independent candidate running in Florida’s 22nd Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress as a Republican in the same district in 2020. The homepage of her campaign website in 2020 had featured the QAnon slogan. And a Gab account that apparently belongs to her posted in April that Q had “exposed the corruption and now we were seeing it play out.” The post also stated that she had met former national security adviser Michael Flynn and told him, “Thank you for being Q.” The post also included the QAnon slogan.

  • Christine Scott website QAnon
  • Reba Sherrill

    Reba Sherrill is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Florida. She unsuccessfully ran for Florida’s 21st Congressional District in 2020. In a YouTube video in early 2020, a QAnon supporter interviewed Sherrill about attending a Florida QAnon “Great Awakening” rally, during which she said, “I've been following Q since the beginning.” She has also repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan and the QAnon hashtag. On her campaign site, her platform seems to reference the adrenochrome conspiracy theory -- a belief among QAnon supporters that Democratic elites harvest that drug from children under torture -- by claiming in a section about human trafficking, “They ‘farm’ for many reasons,” and mentioning “child sacrifice” and “organ harvesting.”

  • Video file

    Citation From a video uploaded to YouTube on February 26, 2020

  • Carla Spalding

    Carla Spalding is a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 23rd Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Spalding tweeted the QAnon slogan in 2018.

  • Carla Spalding QAnon Twitter
  • Lavern Spicer

    Lavern Spicer is a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 24th Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. On Facebook, Spicer has more than once posted a link to a YouTube video titled “Fall of Cabal,” which The New York Times noted is “core QAnon content” that “many QAnon believers have credited with spurring their interest” in the conspiracy theory.

  • Lavern Spicer QAnon Facebook
  • Darlene Swaffar

    Darlene Swaffar is a Republican candidate running in Florida’s 22nd Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Swaffar has repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan and has posted a video of herself taking an oath supporting QAnon. On her personal Facebook page -- the intro section of which also included the QAnon slogan -- Swaffar had posted multiple QAnon memes. In April 2019, Swaffar wrote on a Facebook page called “QAnon Great Awakening” that the page’s posts about QAnon “inspired me to explore my run for Congress in 2020.”

  • Darlene Swaffar QAnon Facebook page
  • Georgia

  • Marjorie Taylor Greene

    Marjorie Taylor Greene is an incumbent Republican member of Congress who is running for reelection in Georgia’s 14th Congressional District. Greene has posted the QAnon slogan on Facebook and on Twitter, the latter in response to a tweet defending the legitimacy of Q, writing, “Trust the plan” (another catchphrase used by QAnon supporters). She also has tweeted the QAnon-connected hashtag "#GreatAwakening" to far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones. 

    Greene has also appeared in a video where she discussed following QAnon, calling Q a “patriot” and “worth listening to,” and she wrote favorably about the conspiracy theory on a now-defunct website. In 2018, she posted on Facebook about an “awesome post by Q” and in a video echoed another Q post about a conspiracy theory that former President Barack Obama’s administration had MS-13 gang members kill Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich. According to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Greene had also “posted a series of tweets defending QAnon, including one” -- now deleted -- “encouraging her followers to message her with questions so she can ‘walk you through the whole thing.’” Greene has also pushed the Pizzagate conspiracy theory.

    In August 2020, Greene attempted to distance herself from QAnon, dubiously claiming to Fox News that she chose “another path” due to “misinformation” from Q about the 2018 midterm elections. In Congress, Greene said that after “seeing things in the news that didn't make sense to me,” she “stumbled across” QAnon at the end of 2017 and “was allowed to believe things that weren't true.”

  • Illinois

  • Bobby Piton

    Bobby Piton is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Illinois. Piton -- who has been involved with an audit of ballots in Maricopa County, Arizona, for the 2020 presidential election -- has posted multiple “Q” drops on Facebook, along with posting an image featuring the QAnon slogan and a meme referencing a belief pushed by some QAnon supporters that John F. Kennedy Jr. is secretly still alive despite dying in a plane crash. He has also written, “You are the lucky number 1... 7 on the Truth is Right!!!  Q...uestion for you .... do you know some letter is???” — likely a reference to Q, which is the 17th letter of the alphabet. He has also appeared on QAnon show RedPill78, whose host has admitted to participating in part of the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. According to The Daily Beast, Piton has claimed that “he didn’t know much about QAnon” and has associated with Ron Watkins, previously the administrator of 8kun. Piton also wrote on Gab that QAnon “makes for entertaining reading, but it’s no more accurate than the corrupt MSM.”

  • Bobby Piton QAnon Facebook
  • Philanise White

    Philanise White is a Republican candidate running in Illinois’ 1st Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. White has tweeted the QAnon slogan more than once.

  • Philanise White QAnon Twitter
  • Maryland

  • Jon McGreevey

    Jon McGreevey is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. While McGreevey has tweeted that he “never followed Q,” he has written that “I follow others who decipher” Q posts, and he has also inquired about or referenced specific Q posts. Additionally, he has claimed that “if Q stands for anything it is getting the truth out there” and that the “DS [deep state]” had tried to “discredit” Q. McGreevey has also invoked the adrenochrome part of the conspiracy theory.

  • Jon McGreevey QAnon Twitter
  • Minnesota

  • Danielle Stella

    Danielle Stella is a Republican candidate running in Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. She has posted in support of QAnon, worn QAnon apparel, and shared a QAnon video. An apparent aide for Stella told Right Wing Watch that Stella “stands 100% behind the principles of patriotism, unity/inclusiveness (WWG1WGA!) and love for country that Qanon promotes.” Stella also appears to have been a member of a small QAnon group on Telegram, where she had posted about being in a “#QArmy” and praised her “Qfamily.” A former campaign staffer dubiously told The Daily Beast that Stella's support for QAnon was “a ruse” to get support. Stella has also endorsed another baseless conspiracy theory originating from 4chan that accused incumbent Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) of hiring a hit man to kill a woman.

  • Stella Telegram QAnon
  • Nevada

  • Sam Peters

    Sam Peters is a Republican candidate running in Nevada’s 4th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. He has tweeted the QAnon hashtag “#QArmy.”

  • Sam Peters QAnon Twitter
  • Mindy Robinson

    Mindy Robinson is an independent candidate (under the “Patriot Party of Nevada”) running in Nevada’s 3rd Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for Congress as a Republican in the same district in 2020. She has posted the QAnon slogan, both misspelled and spelled correctly, on Facebook and Twitter. Newsweek has since interviewed Robinson and wrote that she “said she is a QAnon supporter in the way she hopes to stop child trafficking and protect them from pedophiles” and “said she has no reason to disavow her support of QAnon as wanting to protect children should not be considered a dangerous thing.”

  • Mindy Robinson QAnon Twitter post
  • New Jersey

  • Tricia Flanagan

    Tricia Flanagan is a Republican candidate running in New Jersey’s 3rd Congressional District. She unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in New Jersey in 2020. In April 2020, she tweeted “ThanQ” in response to a QAnon account promoting her candidacy alongside the conspiracy theory.

  • Tricia Flanagan QAnon Twitter
  • Billy Prempeh

    Billy Prempeh is a Republican candidate running in New Jersey’s 9th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. On his campaign Facebook page, Prempeh had posted a photo of himself next to a “Q” flag, writing out the QAnon slogan alongside it. He has also tweeted the QAnon slogan and mentioned in a YouTube interview that “Q” and “the Great Awakening” are “stuff that we've got going on right now.”

  • Billy Prempeh QAnon Facebook
  • New York

  • Joel Anabilah-Azumah

    Joel Anabilah-Azumah is an independent candidate running for the U.S. Senate in New York. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress as a member of the Serve America Movement Party in New York’s 9th Congressional District in 2020. In a Facebook video, he falsely claimed that “there is no such thing as the QAnon movement” and that instead “there is such a thing as the Q team, and they are allegedly military intelligence.” (The false claim, which he has also tweeted, echoes a Q post urging supporters to deny that QAnon exists.) He also added that “there is such a thing as the anons” who “do research,” and claimed that the “intelligence gathering between the Q team and the anons … has created an environment where information that was previously hidden by the intelligence agencies became public in a fashion that they could not control.” He also said that “Q was helping us find out certain things we didn’t already know.” Anabilah-Azumah has also tweeted to someone that Q is “an information exchange much like we do on your site or many different transit forums” and has tweeted that Q was “being attacked ... because a lot of interesting info flows through the place.”

  • Video file

    Citation From a February 3, 2021, Facebook video

  • Tina Forte

    Tina Forte is a Republican candidate running in New York’s 14th Congressional District. As noted by Snopes, she has repeatedly posted a misspelled version of the QAnon slogan on Facebook, including while posting a photo of herself wearing a hat with the slogan, which she told a user referred to “the great awakening ... the deep state.” She also invoked the #savethechildren campaign on social media when it was being co-opted by QAnon supporters. In March, Forte tweeted that she “was never a Q believer and never will be.”

  • Tina Forte QAnon Facebook
  • Antoine Tucker

    Antoine Tucker is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in New York. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in New York’s 14th Congressional District in 2020. Tucker (who goes by “Tony Montaga” or “Montaga” on his social media accounts) has tweeted, “I am a Q Supporter,” and he has posted on Facebook and Instagram an image of a “Q,” writing alongside the QAnon slogan, “What makes humans different from other Animals? We laugh, cry & we ASK QUESTIONS” and “#conspiracyfactsnottheories.” And on both platforms he has written that “Q” and QAnon supporters “want to investigate, seek the truth and remove those that are elected and committing crimes out of DC.”

  • Antoine Tucker QAnon Facebook
  • North Carolina

  • Steve Von Loor

    Steve Von Loor is a Republican candidate running in North Carolina’s 4th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. On his since-suspended Twitter account, he had repeatedly tweeted the QAnon hashtag and QAnon slogan.

  • Steve Von Loor Twitter QAnon
  • Ohio

  • J.R. Majewski

    J.R. Majewski is a Republican candidate running in Ohio’s 9th Congressional District. Majewski has posted QAnon hashtags on Instagram and appeared on Fox News while wearing a QAnon shirt. Majewski has also associated with and appeared multiple times on QAnon show RedPill78, including when he and host Zak Paine discussed participating together in part of the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Majewski has since denied supporting QAnon, telling The Blade, “I’ve never read any QAnon drop — what they call the ‘Q drop,’ what they post on the website.” Though he added, “You’ll see me on the podcast with a guy that believes in QAnon,” referring to Paine.

  • wwg1wga majewski
  • Mark Pukita

    Mark Pukita is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Ohio. He has more than once tweeted the QAnon slogan and criticized the “MSM, Democrats & Dem Operatives” for “putting a full-court-press on disparaging & quashing the QAnon movement.” This post included an image with text saying, “You’re over the target,” a phrase often used among QAnon supporters. Pukita has also previously appeared on QAnon show RedPill78. Pukita has since told Newsweek that he denounces the conspiracy theory, saying QAnon is “a fictitious construct that was made public and got out of hand” and that “Q is a mental construct for someone hoping there are good people in our intelligence community.”

  • Mark Pukita QAnon Twitter
  • Oregon

  • Jo Rae Perkins

    Jo Rae Perkins is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Oregon, where she unsuccessfully ran in 2020. She has repeatedly tweeted in support of QAnon and posted the QAnon slogan on Twitter. Perkins has also said she follows the “Q team,” pushed a “#QProof” (supposed evidence that Q posts are accurate), posted links on Facebook to multiple QAnon YouTube videos, and linked to a site that collects Q posts. She also demanded that reporters ask then-President Donald Trump “the #Q,” referring to a belief among the conspiracy theory’s supporters that Trump would confirm Q was real if asked. Additionally, Perkins has posted a video of herself taking an oath supporting QAnon.

    In a January 2020 interview that she livestreamed and which featured a “WWG1WGA” sticker in the background, Perkins expanded upon her belief in QAnon, comparing the Q posts to secret codes used during World War II and saying there is a “very strong probability/possibility that ‘Q’ is a real group of people, military intelligence, working with President Trump.” Later in the interview, she compared believing in Q to believing in Jesus Christ and claimed that “‘Q’ is most likely military intelligence ... and they've been out there watching what's been going on with our country for decades and they are partnered with President Trump to stop the corruption and to save our republic.” Perkins also said her QAnon support is part of her campaign strategy and claimed that “there's a lot more people that are running for political office that follow Q than are admitting to it.”

  • Video file

    Citation From a January 3, 2020, livestream on Jo Rae Perkins' Facebook page

  • Pennsylvania

  • Bobby Jeffries

    Bobby Jeffries is a Republican candidate running for the U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in Pennsylvania’s 10th Congressional District and for a seat in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 2020 -- dropping out of both races before Election Day. In since-deleted tweets, Jeffries had repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan and wrote, “#QAnon for the win!”

  • Bobby Jeffries QAnon tweet
  • Rhode Island

  • Robert Lancia

    Robert Lancia is a Republican candidate and a former member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives who is running in Rhode Island’s 2nd Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Lancia has retweeted content explicitly promoting QAnon, though in August 2020 he denied to The Public’s Radio in Rhode Island that he supports the conspiracy theory. Lancia told the outlet that “someone else on his campaign handles his Twitter” and said that his account retweeted QAnon content because “probably it was attached to something else – maybe something to do with the president, MAGA, something like that.”

  • Bob Lancia QAnon retweets
  • Texas

  • Ruben Landon Dante

    Ruben Landon Dante is a Republican candidate running in Texas’ 14th Congressional District. On his YouTube channel, he has posted a video titled “Q- Eradicating Pedophilia, Healing & Finding Forgiveness.” On Facebook, he has paid for an ad featuring the QAnon-related hashtag “TheGreatAwakening” and posted a link to a YouTube video titled “Fall of Cabal,” calling it a “must watch.” According to The New York Times, that video is “core QAnon content” that “many QAnon believers have credited with spurring their interest” in the conspiracy theory. Dante also wrote a blog on his campaign site titled “Who is ‘The Deep State’” about “how The Government Elite are Devil Worshippers.” He also tweeted about it, writing, “Here is some Pastel Q” -- a reference to the spread of the conspiracy theory among alternative lifestyle influencers and related groups known as “Pastel QAnon.” Additionally, he has criticized those who, he claims, have “censored Q.”

  • Ruben Landon Dante QAnon YouTube
  • Mayra Flores

    Mayra Flores is a Republican candidate running in Texas’ 34th Congressional District. She has repeatedly posted the QAnon hashtag and “#Q” on Twitter and on Facebook. On Instagram, she has also repeatedly posted the QAnon slogan.

  • Mayra Flores QAnon Instagram
  • Johnny Teague

    Johnny Teague is a Republican candidate running in Texas’ 9th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Teague, on his since-deleted campaign account, had retweeted content explicitly promoting QAnon, including retweeting a video of QAnon supporters taking an oath supporting the conspiracy theory. He also retweeted a false conspiracy theory pushed by some QAnon supporters that John F. Kennedy Jr. is secretly still alive even though he died in a plane crash.

  • Johnny Teague QAnon Twitter1
  • Samuel Williams

    Samuel Williams is a Republican candidate running in Texas’ 16th Congressional District. He unsuccessfully ran for Congress in the same district in 2020. Williams has tweeted the QAnon hashtag and repeatedly tweeted the QAnon slogan. In early 2020, he also ran a Facebook ad promoting an appearance on Patriots' Soapbox, where he appealed for financial support for his campaign. And yet, Texas Monthly reported in July 2020 that Williams denied supporting the conspiracy theory, claiming he thought it “was just a bunch of crap” that “doesn’t make a whole lot of sense,” and said that he used QAnon hashtags “to gain followers” on social media.

  • Samuel Williams QAnon Twitter
  • Correction (6/3/21): This piece originally said 15 of the known candidates at the time had also run for Congress in 2020. The actual number was 14.