Kevin Corke | Media Matters for America

Kevin Corke

Tags ››› Kevin Corke
  • Fox keeps promoting Joel Rosenberg as a "Russia expert" based on his book. It's a novel.

    Blog ››› ››› MATT GERTZ

    Fox News has repeatedly aired the Russia commentary of the author Joel C. Rosenberg over the past few weeks, credentialing him as a “Russia expert” and pointing to his recent bestseller, The Kremlin Conspiracy. In an appearance on the network and in packaged reports, hosts and contributors of the network’s putative hard news programs have described Rosenberg as “the author of a very important book,” a “New York Times bestselling author and author of the brand new book,” and “the author of the bestselling book The Kremlin Conspiracy."

    There’s just one problem: The Kremlin Conspiracy isn’t, as the title might imply to those hearing of it from Fox personalities, a work of history, or political analysis, or journalism. It’s a political thriller.

    Rosenberg is a former Republican political operative who used the right-wing connections he established working for radio host Rush Limbaugh, among others, to carve out a niche writing conservative fiction that his website describes as “ripped from tomorrow’s headlines.” The Twelfth Imam series, for example, is about a CIA operative’s quest to “disrupt Iran’s nuclear weapons program” as an “obscure religious cleric is suddenly hailed throughout the region as the Islamic messiah known as the Mahdi or the Twelfth Imam.”

    Rosenberg, who believes that we are currently in the biblical End Times and that the rapture and second coming of Jesus Christ are quickly approaching, is also the author of “nonfiction” books that apply biblical prophecy to current events. An evangelical Christian of Jewish ancestry who celebrates that “Jews are turning to Jesus in record numbers” and “getting excited about His Second Coming,” Rosenberg is also the founder of The Joshua Fund, a nonprofit group that seeks to “mobilize Christians to ‘bless Israel and her neighbors in the name of Jesus.’”

    Publisher’s materials describe The Kremlin Conspiracy as follows:

    With an American president distracted by growing tensions in North Korea and Iran, an ominous new threat is emerging in Moscow. A czar is rising in the Kremlin, a Russian president feverishly consolidating power, silencing his opposition, and plotting a brazen and lightning-fast military strike that could rupture the NATO alliance and bring Washington and Moscow to the brink of nuclear war. But in his blind spot is the former U.S. Secret Service agent, Marcus Ryker, trained to protect but ready to kill to save his country.

    The fact that The Kremlin Conspiracy is a novel is rarely addressed when Fox features Rosenberg’s Russia commentary.

    In packaged reports that aired Monday night on Special Report and Fox News @ Night, Fox White House Correspondent Kevin Corke referenced Rosenberg’s book and aired an image of its cover. In both cases, he then aired a clip of Rosenberg -- described in the caption as a “Russia expert” -- commenting on the U.S. decision to expel Russian diplomats in response to that country’s alleged involvement in the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the United Kingdom earlier this month by calling for an even harsher response.

    In neither case did Corke note that The Kremlin Conspiracy is a work of fiction (though small text on the cover he aired does describe it as “a novel”).

    Likewise, when Fox News @ Night host Shannon Bream hosted Rosenberg to discuss Russia earlier this month, she introduced him as “New York Times bestselling author and author of the brand new book The Kremlin Conspiracy.” It was Rosenberg himself who mentioned in passing that the work was a novel, as he drew comparisons between its fictional antagonist and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    “And you know, my fictional dictator takes us as weakness,” he commented. “There was a quote by Vladimir Lenin, years ago. And he said, ‘Probe with bayonets -- if you find mush, push. If you find steel, stop.’ Putin is probing us for weaknesses, in cyber, in invading countries, in taking out dissidence. And under Obama, mush. Will he find steel in President Trump? That's what we need.” Bream responded by praising Rosenberg’s book, saying, “Once you pick it up, you can’t put it down.”

    Rosenberg has also written and spoken extensively about the various "signs" indicating the second coming of Jesus Christ may be imminent (including the "supersign" that was the "rebirth of Israel in 1948").

    Fox has repeatedly hosted Rosenberg, either credentialing him as a national security expert or bringing him on to discuss whether particular events -- such as the civil war in Syria -- indicate the approach of the biblical End of Days. He was a particular favorite of former Fox host Glenn Beck, not only appearing on his TV and radio shows but also featuring prominently in Beck’s documentary Understanding the Holy Land, which gives a history of Israel through the lens of its role in End Times prophecies.

    In one 2011 appearance, Bream introduced Rosenberg by saying of an alleged plot by an Iranian-American man to assassinate a Saudi diplomat: “The Iranian plot FBI director Mueller has talked about this week also reads like the pages of a soon-to-be-released novel by an author that some are calling a ‘modern-day Nostradamus.’ Joel Rosenberg's new book, The Tehran Initiative, bears an eerie, uncanny resemblance to current events. And it isn't the first time he's written fiction that's foreshadowed the future -- it's a special gift I think he has.”

  • After horrific casualties in Las Vegas, right-wing media say now is not the time to talk about gun violence

    ››› ››› ZACHARY PLEAT

    Right-wing media figures are saying it’s too soon to debate measures to reduce gun violence after at least 58 people were killed and over 500 were wounded in Las Vegas, NV, in what news organizations are calling the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. According to police officials, the shooter had 10 rifles in his possession at the scene.

  • Fringe media and Fox News push conspiracy theories regarding arrested former House IT staffer

    ››› ››› ALEX KAPLAN & BRENDAN KARET

    Following the arrest of former Democratic information technology staffer Imran Awan, far-right media and Fox News pushed multiple conspiracy theories about him, suggesting he was behind WikiLeaks getting hacked Democratic National Committee (DNC) emails, that he had damaging information on House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and that the Clintons were somehow involved in the situation.

  • Contra right-wing media, US officials have verified core aspects of the Trump dossier

    ››› ››› NICK FERNANDEZ

    Right-wing media have waged a months-long attempt to discredit the 35-page dossier produced by a former British intelligence officer that contains allegations of coordination between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. Various right-wing commentators have described its contents as “unreliable,” “discredited,” “largely debunked,” and "evidence of ... collusion between Democrats and Russian disinformation," including a Washington Times story that Trump promoted this week. But, according to numerous reports, American intelligence officials have “verified” various “core” aspects of the dossier.

  • Will right-wing media call out Georgia GOP leader for politicizing Scalise’s shooting?

    Conservatives have repeatedly slammed lawmakers “politicizing” tragedy by merely talking about gun violence in the wake of a shooting

    Blog ››› ››› JULIE ALDERMAN

    Right-wing media have been quick to criticize politicians and activists for “politicizing” mass shootings by talking about gun violence prevention in their wake. But after a GOP official in Georgia suggested that the June 14 shooting in Alexandria, VA, which critically injured House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) and four others, “is going to win this election for us,” will conservatives care enough to call out the clear exploitation and politicization of the shooting?

    The Washington Post reported that ahead of the June 20 special election for a congressional seat in Georgia’s sixth district, Brad Carver, the chairman of the Republican party in a neighboring district, said, “I’ll tell you what: I think the shooting is going to win this election for us,” adding, “moderates and independents in this district are tired of left-wing extremism.”

    In the past, Fox News and others in conservative media have derided officials for “politicizing” tragedies because they spoke out about gun violence prevention in the wake of shootings. After the June 12, 2016, shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, FL, then-Fox News contributor Stacey Dash lambasted former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton for “politicizing” the shooting in order to “advance an anti-gun agenda.” After an August 2015, shooting in Virginia, Sean Hannity called out Obama, saying he “tried to politicize” the shooting by talking about gun violence. And after an October 2015 mass shooting in Oregon, Fox’s Kevin Corke criticized Obama for “politicizing” gun violence, saying, “Politicizing gun violence usually is a terrible decision.”

    Carver isn’t advocating for a solution to gun violence, but rather he is celebrating the potential political advantage the shooting could bring. Despite Carver’s blunt politicization of the shooting, it seems unlikely that right-wing media will break from their campaign against Democrat Jon Ossoff to speak out against it.

  • Don't Let Spicer And The Trump Administration Off The Hook For Winking At Anti-Semites

    Blog ››› ››› JULIE ALDERMAN

    Media shouldn’t be so willing to let White House press secretary Sean Spicer off the hook for his comments comparing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to Adolf Hitler given the implicit and explicit ways President Donald Trump and his administration have embraced white nationalists. No matter how ineffective, Spicer’s comparison is another example of a wink and a nod to the type of hatred that is a part of this White House’s culture.

    During an April 11 White House press briefing, Spicer likened Assad to Hitler, telling reporters that unlike Assad, “you had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.” When he was asked to clarify, Spicer said that Hitler “was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing,” when in reality the German SS and police used poison gas to asphyxiate millions of Jews in concentration camps (which Spicer called “Holocaust centers” in his comments). After repeatedly trying to explain his comments, Spicer ultimately apologized, calling them “inexcusable and reprehensible.” Meanwhile, white nationalists cheered the remarks, praising the press secretary for exposing the “Jewish gas chamber hoax.”​

    Media were quick to accept Spicer’s apology and let him off the hook. Fox News’ Kevin Corke called it “heartfelt and … very unequivocal” and added, “he should be able to move on … quickly.” CNN’s Chris Cillizza said, “I’m going to give Sean the benefit of the doubt,” saying Spicer “got himself into a verbal trap and could not get himself out.” On CNN’s New Day, Ari Fleischer, who served as press secretary to former President George W. Bush, accepted Spicer’s apology, adding that “the notion that this is somehow nefarious or indicative of Holocaust denial, I dismiss.” Additionally, CNN commentator David Axelrod tweeted that Spicer has “apologized” for his comments and it’s “time to move on.”

    But this is hardly the first time that Spicer and the Trump administration used obtuse language or offered an implicit nod to the white nationalist community. For instance:

    • Trump hired Stephen Bannon, who previously ran Breitbart, a "platform for the” white nationalist “alt-right" movement as his chief strategist -- a move that was lavishly praised by white nationalists.

    • At the end of the presidential campaign, Trump ran an ad that Talking Point Memo’s Josh Marshall wrote was “packed with anti-Semitic dog whistles, anti-Semitic tropes and anti-Semitic vocabulary.” Naturally, Trump’s white nationalist supporters loved it, calling it “absolutely fantastic.”

    • The White House failed to mention the Jewish people in a statement commemorating International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

    This is in addition to the direct contact Trump and his aides have had with members of the white nationalist community. For instance:

    • According to The New York Times, Trump has “retweeted supportive messages from racist or nationalist” supporters, including “accounts featuring white nationalist or Nazi themes.”

    • Trump refused to disavow former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke during an interview with CNN, drawing praise from his neo-Nazi supporters.

    • The Trump campaign gave press credentials to the white nationalist radio show The Political Cesspool. Donald Trump Jr. also appeared on the radio show to complain about “political correctness.”

    • Former Trump adviser A.J. Delgado retweeted a Trump endorsement from the anti-Semitic hate site The Right Stuff.

    • Trump’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway tweeted “love you back” to an anti-Semitic Twitter account.

    Media figures are wrong to simply dismiss Spicer’s Holocaust comments as a hiccup. The connections between the Trump team and the white nationalist community are too strong for Spicer’s comments to be treated as a one-off. Spicer’s blunder is emblematic of the administration’s continuing effort to wink and nod at -- and sometimes openly embrace -- its white nationalist supporters.

  • Right-Wing Media Bolster Trump’s Unsubstantiated, Dangerous Claims Of “Large Scale Voter Fraud”

    ››› ››› BRENNAN SUEN

    Right-wing media bolstered Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s claim that “there is large scale voter fraud happening on and before election day.” Conservatives asserted that dead people “vote for Hillary” and “for Democrats” and that early voting was implemented to give someone “a little hand” in elections.

  • Media Echo Inaccurate GOP Talking Points To Blame Obama And Biden For Republican SCOTUS Obstructionism

    ››› ››› NICK FERNANDEZ

    Media inaccurately equated President Obama's 2006 Senate filibuster vote of then-Judge Samuel Alito and Vice President Biden's 1992 comments on the Senate floor about a Supreme Court nomination in an election year to Senate Republicans' unprecedented attempts to block the president's nomination of Chief Judge Merrick Garland.