Joe Johns

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  • CNN Turns To Conservative Activist To Push Affirmative Action Myth

    Blog ››› ››› REMINGTON SHEPARD

    CNN turned to conservative activist Gail Heriot to push the myth that affirmative action allows students of color to attend upper tier schools for which they are ill-equipped.

    The Supreme Court is hearing Fisher v. Texas, a case challenging the University of Texas' affirmative action plan. In a report on the case, CNN's Joe Johns stated: "Conservative groups siding with Fisher argue it's not just about getting in. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes."

    Johns then aired video of Civil Rights Commissioner Gail Heriot saying: "If they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering."

    In fact, experts have debunked the theory Heriot pushed, which is commonly known as the "mismatch" theory. A court filing by professors of statistics and related fields explained that the research on which Heriot's argument is based "has major methodological flaws" and is "not good social science."

    These experts pointed out that reliable studies actually disprove this theory. For instance, one study found that "minority students who benefited from affirmative action earned higher grades and left school at lower rates than others, and they expressed neither greater nor less satisfaction with college life in general."

    Additionally, Heriot is not an unbiased member of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. Heriot was reportedly an alternate delegate for the 2000 Republican National Convention. She also is a member of  the conservative Federalist Society, once served as an aide to Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, and served as the co-chair of a 1996 effort in California that outlawed affirmative action programs. 

  • Politico contributors, guests on CNN and MSNBC join chorus claiming Clinton will bring "drama" to sec. of state office

    ››› ››› ANDREW WALZER

    Since initial reporting that President-elect Barack Obama was considering naming Sen. Hillary Clinton as secretary of state, many in the media have raised the specter of personal and political "drama" -- which they claim follows Hillary and Bill Clinton wherever they go -- negatively affecting the Obama administration. The Chicago Tribune's Clarence Page acknowledged that the media are hoping for "drama" resulting from a Clinton appointment; Page responded to the question of how Obama is "going to keep the drama at bay" by saying: "Well, do we want that? We're journalists."

  • CNN failed to note Dole "Godless" ad's voiceover controversy

    ››› ››› MARK BOCHKIS

    CNN anchor Kyra Phillips presented a report by correspondent Joe Johns on an ad in which Sen. Elizabeth Dole accused Democratic opponent Kay Hagan of taking money from "a leader of the Godless America PAC" at "a secret fundraiser" and that included a woman's voice saying, "There is no God," while a picture of Hagan appeared onscreen. But while Johns and Phillips noted that Hagan has indicated an intention to file a defamation lawsuit, they did not note that in accusing Dole of defamation, Hagan cites the ad's false suggestion that the voice is Hagan's.