Catherine Herridge

Tags ››› Catherine Herridge
  • Fox Pushes Conspiracy That Obama Is Protecting Clinton On Emails Due To “Personal Conflict”

    Blog ››› ››› THOMAS BISHOP

    After months of a coordinated smear campaign against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email account during her tenure at the State Department, Fox News is now suggesting that President Obama may be protecting Clinton from criminal charges due to a “personal conflict” because he exchanged emails with her over her private server. Fox asserted that Obama was protecting Clinton while admitting that the investigation has found that none of the emails between the two contained classified information.

    On the April 11 edition of The Kelly File, Fox chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge conducted a supposed “fact-check” of Obama’s comment, “I continue to believe [Hillary Clinton] has not jeopardized America’s national security,” which he made during an April 10 interview on Fox News Sunday. Herridge scandalized Obama’s remarks by suggesting that the president should have declined to comment on the investigation and questioning whether Obama may have “a personal conflict” due to reports that he exchanged as many as 19 emails with Clinton.

    In Herridge’s report, she admitted that the emails between the president and Clinton “don’t contain classified information,” but she also included commentary from former Bush administration Assistant Attorney General Thomas Dupree, who suggested that Obama has a “personal conflict” in the investigation.

    Fox News has been on the offensive since the beginning of the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server during her time as secretary of state, baselessly claiming that her private email use constituted a crime and that she negligently transmitted top secret information that put lives at risk.

    Legal experts have consistently explained that “there doesn't seem to be a legitimate basis for any sort of criminal charge against” Clinton. In a March 20 column for the American Prospect, University of Michigan law and sociology professor and former Department of Homeland Security classification expert Richard Lempert explained that after analyzing Clinton’s conduct and “[b]ased on what has been revealed so far, there is no reason to think that Clinton committed any crimes with respect to the use of her email server, including her handling of classified information.” 

    In addition to the lack of evidence of criminal wrongdoing by then-Secretary of State Clinton, a thorough State Department investigation concluded that past secretaries of state -- including Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice -- and their immediate staff also "handled classified material on unclassified email systems."

    Herridge has also repeatedly reported unreliable information provided by unnamed sources in order to attack Clinton. In January, Herridge boosted the reportedly false claim that up to 150 FBI agents were assigned to the investigation on Clinton’s server. On March 29, The Washington Post issued a correction for its own report that nearly 150 agents were involved, noting that there is actually less than 50. NBC News later reported that the number of agents assigned to the case was “about 12,” with a former FBI official quoted as saying, "You need an act of terrorism to get 50 agents working on something." Herridge also cited anonymous sources who accused Clinton of gross negligence and violation of the espionage statutes in her handling of purportedly “classified” or “top secret” information, a claim experts have repeatedly called into question. 

     

  • The "150 FBI Agents" Fiasco Isn't The First Time Anonymous Sources Have Burned Fox's Herridge

    Facts Have Consistently Undermined Catherine Herridge's Unnamed Clinton Email Sources

    ››› ››› ANDREW LAWRENCE

    In her articles on Hillary Clinton's use of private email while secretary of state, Fox News chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge has relied heavily on anonymous sources to push allegations that Clinton used her email inappropriately. But the facts have consistently undermined many claims Herridge has made in her reports, including the debunked assertion that 150 FBI agents were investigating Clinton's private email server -- a wildly exaggerated figure that The Washington Post also reported.

  • A Timeline Of The Anonymously Sourced FBI Agent Numbers That Distorted The Clinton Email Server Investigation

    The Numbers Have Changed From 150 To 12

    ››› ››› BRENNAN SUEN

    Since January, numerous outlets, including Fox News and The Washington Post, have cited anonymous or discredited sources to claim that up to 150 FBI agents were investigating Hillary Clinton's private email server. But the number of agents has been a moving target, with the Post later correcting itself to say it was "less than 50" and NBC saying March 30 that the number is closer to 12. NBC's source -- also anonymous -- called the earlier figures "ridiculous" and said, "You need an act of terrorism to get 50 agents working on something."

  • Fox News Erroneously Insists It Was Illegal For Hillary Clinton To Discuss NY Times Articles In Emails

    ››› ››› THOMAS BISHOP

    Fox News' chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge hyped claims from an anonymous source that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's personal email "discussed [an] Afghan national's CIA ties" to allege that Clinton violated a 2009 executive order clarifying classification procedures. But Clinton's emails reportedly discussed already published articles by the New York Times, which are not automatically classified under the executive order.

  • Fox Is Obsessed With Pushing The Debunked "Smoking Gun" Claim That Clinton Intentionally Misled The Public About Benghazi Attackers' Motivations

    ››› ››› TYLER CHERRY

    Fox News is obsessively promoting as a "smoking gun" the debunked allegations that Hillary Clinton intentionally misled the public about the Benghazi attacks, knowingly telling the public that an inflammatory video spontaneously inspired the violence while privately acknowledging it was pre-planned. However, Clinton has explained that the State Department's understanding of and explanation for the attacks changed as "piecemeal" and "conflicting" early intelligence reports were replaced by more reliable information.

  • Fox's Evidence Of Clinton Email Cover-Up Is Really Just Routine Privileged Information Exemption

    ››› ››› RACHEL CALVERT

    Fox News cited anonymous sources to scandalize the State Department's decision to recategorize some of Hillary Clinton's emails, using technical language to avoid admitting that the emails were simply designated as privileged communications -- a common type of redaction to protect agency deliberations. Instead, Fox hyped the change as evidence of a concerted cover-up to "hide classified info."

  • Conservative Media's Fact-Challenged Comparison Between David Petraeus And Hillary Clinton

    ››› ››› KATIE SULLIVAN

    Conservative media are likening Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's email use as secretary of state to retired Gen. David Petraeus' illegal mishandling of confidential information, claiming a "double standard" because Petraeus was convicted of a  misdemeanor, while Clinton is not under criminal investigation. But that comparison ignores the central fact that Petraeus knowingly handed over classified materials to his biographer, while Clinton followed State Department rules concerning private email use and was unaware of any classified information in her unmarked email correspondence.

  • Fox Runs With Bogus ISIS Link To Chattanooga Shooting

    UPDATE: Fox Admits It Was Wrong About ISIS Tweet

    Blog ››› ››› OLIVER WILLIS

    Fox News reported that an "ISIS-linked" Twitter account warned of today's shooting in Tennessee before it happened, but the tweet in question was sent after the attack had ended. The falsehood was propagated by anti-Islam blogger Pamela Geller before spreading through conservative media

    Four Marines were killed when a shooter fired on two military sites in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Fox News reported that the attacks may be connected to ISIS because an ISIS supporter purportedly discussed the shooting on Twitter before it happened. Fox host Sean Hannity repeated the false claim on his radio show.

    In fact, the tweet Fox News referenced was posted well after the shooting had already occurred. Mashable editor Brian Ries first pointed out the discrepancy.

    On Your World, Fox's chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge reported, "the last investigative thread I would mention at this point is that we're taking a hard look at a Twitter account -- an ISIS-linked Twitter account -- that seemed to have foreknowledge of the shooting in Chattanooga. The tweet went out at 10:34 with the hashtag Chattanooga referring to American dogs and a likely shooting. This of course was about 15 minutes before the shooting took place."

    On his radio show, Fox News host Sean Hannity also referenced the inaccurate information.

    HANNITY: We have a report from Robert Spencer's Jihad Watch, that he's put together -- a timeline regarding today's, what they are now calling a domestic terrorist act in Chattanooga. We have four Marines that have been killed. By the way, our thoughts, our prayers are with the families and the entire military community there. According to the AP, the shooting started around 10:30, 10:45. The Islamic State tweeted a warning about the attack, posted at 10:34 a.m. The ISIS tweet specifically mentioned Chattanooga, which is an obvious reference to the attack. If it's true that ISIS was taking credit for the shooting at the exact same time, or maybe slightly before the shooting commenced, that would be pretty strong evidence of a connection. And Spencer reminds us the Islamic State has called on Muslims to murder American military personnel here in the U.S.

    Fox repeated the claim in further segments on Your World, The Five, and later on Special Report.

    The source of the claim is conservative blogger Pamela Geller, who has a long history of anti-Muslim activism.

    Geller made the claim on Twitter and on her blog, writing, "This morning an ISIS supporter tweeted this at 10:34 am -- the shooting started at 10:45." The report cited by Hannity from Jihad Watch cites Geller as the source. Spencer has often worked with Geller on anti-Muslim projects.

    But the tweet was posted at 1:34 p.m. Eastern time, not 10:34 a.m., as Geller asserted. According to news reports, the shooting "unfolded at two sites over 30 minutes" and started "around 10:45 a.m. ET."

    The image of the tweet she references on her blog appears to be stamped with the Western time zone -- Twitter time stamps are based on the user's time zone, not the time zone of the person who made the tweet.

    Media Matters took this screenshot of the ISIS supporter's Twitter account at 5:13 p.m. ET, and it shows that the post was made 4 hours previously (near the 1 o'clock hour Eastern time).

    Conservative blog Weasel Zippers also made the erroneous conclusion about the tweet in a post headlined, "Islamic State Account Tweets Warnings About Chattanooga Moments Before Shooting Began."

    UPDATE: After this story was published, Fox News began to pull back on their allegation. From Special Report with Bret Baier:

    BRET BAIER: Let me be careful about the tweet to the ISIS-related account. In Garland, Texas we know that it came out before the shooting, before that happened. In this case, the time stamp does say 10:34, but we don't know if that's Pacific time, Mountain time, Eastern time, so we have to be careful about it coming out before the shooting. Point is there are ISIS accounts that are pointing directly to this incident and touting it as one of own.

    UPDATE #2: On The O'Reilly Factor, this story was addressed at least three more times.

    At the top of the Factor, O'Reilly reported the "sensational" ISIS tweet story, even after admitting it wasn't "exactly clear whether it's accurate."

    Midway through the show, Catherine Herridge reappeared and admitted that "there are now some questions about the time stamp on one of the ISIS tweets earlier today." When O'Reilly pressed her on how she learned about the tweet, she said, "I first saw it this afternoon, it was part of the social media that was circulating." 

    At the end of the Factor, Special Report anchor Bret Baier clarified the timing of the tweet, saying that "all indications now are that it came out after the attack." When O'Reilly asked if that meant the ISIS tweet story was "a bogus situation," Baier replied, "yeah."