Alex Jones

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  • Vince Foster’s Sister In Wash. Post: “Trump Should Be Ashamed” For Pushing Murder Conspiracy Theory

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    The sister of late White House deputy counsel Vince Foster wrote a Washington Post op-ed strongly condemning presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for reviving the conspiracy theory that the Clintons killed her brother.

    Trump recently told the Post that the circumstances of Foster’s death were “very fishy” and Foster “knew everything that was going on, and then all of a sudden he committed suicide.”

    Sheila Foster Anthony responded to Trump’s “wrong,” “irresponsible,” and “cruel” remarks in a May 26 piece headlined, "Vince Foster was my brother. Donald Trump should be ashamed." She wrote: “For Trump to raise these theories again for political advantage is wrong. I cannot let such craven behavior pass without a response.”

    She noted that five investigations concluded that Foster’s death was a suicide and he “told me he was battling depression” days before he committed suicide.

    “Never for a minute have I doubted that was what happened,” she added.

    Anthony noted that after Foster’s death, she began to read “countless conspiracy theories spun by those who claimed that the Clintons had Vince murdered because he knew something about Whitewater” and “These outrageous suggestions have caused our family untold pain because this issue went on for so long and these reports were so painful to read.”

    Asked about Anthony’s op-ed, Trump today said, “I really know nothing about the Vince Foster situation.” He also claimed it shouldn’t be a part of the campaign “unless some evidence to the contrary of what I’ve seen comes up.”

    Leading conservative media figures and outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, and Fox News have pushed conspiracy theories about Foster and the Clintons in the years after his death.

    While many reporters condemned Trump’s remarks as “bizarre” and “kooky,” his reference to the Foster conspiracy theory drew praise from fringe conservative media.

    Conspiracy theorist radio host Alex Jones on May 24 claimed “there’s a cover-up going on, so we don’t know what it is, but that’s good for an open investigation with the death. .... The Clintons thought they would just have their past not looked at, but Donald Trump is willing to do it.” Jones is one of Trump’s most vocal allies and has hosted the candidate on his program.

    WND, best known for obsessing over President Obama’s birth certificate, recently claimed that Trump’s conspiracy is “backed by new evidence.” The site’s 2015 “man of the year” was none other than Donald Trump, who called the accolade an “amazing honor.”

  • NY Times Highlights How Trump’s “Whole Frame Of Reference” Is Right-Wing Media Conspiracy Theories

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    The New York Times’ Jonathan Martin explained that because presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s “‘whole frame of reference’” for his campaign strategy has been conservative media outlets and discredited conspiracy theories, he’s “obliterated” the line separating elected officials and “conservative mischief makers.”

    Trump has long had a symbiotic relationship with conservative media. Fox News and other right-wing news outlets have built up his campaign and repeatedly defended his controversial policies and rhetoric while Trump has echoed their talking points and peddled their conspiracy theories -- most recently including the claim the Clintons were involved with the death of aide Vince Foster. Trump regularly surrounds himself with and lauds known conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones, an infamous 9/11 truther, and Roger Stone, a notorious dirty trickster who alleges the Clintons are murderers.Trump has also courted and pushed the claims of discredited author and conspiracy theorist Ed Klein, whose conspiracies on the Clintons have been called “fan faction” and “smut.”

    In a May 25 piece, Martin noted that Trump has obliterated “the line separating the conservative mischief makers and the party’s more buttoned-up cadre of elected officials and aides.”Martin also quoted Republican strategists explaining that Trump’s “whole frame of reference is daytime Fox News and [Alex Jones’] Infowars.” From the May 25 New York Times piece:

    Ever since talk radio, cable news and the Internet emerged in the 1990s as potent political forces on the right, Republicans have used those media to attack their opponents through a now-familiar two-step.

    Political operatives would secretly place damaging information with friendly outlets like The Drudge Report and Fox News and with radio hosts like Rush Limbaugh — and then they would work to get the same information absorbed into the mainstream media.

    Candidates themselves would avoid being seen slinging mud, if possible, so as to avoid coming across as undignified or desperate.

    Yet by personally broaching topics like Bill Clinton’s marital indiscretions and the conspiracy theories surrounding the suicide of Vincent W. Foster Jr., a Clinton White House aide, Donald J. Trump is again defying the norms of presidential politics and fashioning his own outrageous style — one that has little use for a middleman, let alone usual ideas about dignity.

    “They’ve reverse-engineered the way it has always worked because they now have a candidate willing to say it himself,” said Danny Diaz, who was a top aide in Jeb Bush’s presidential campaign, speaking with a measure of wonder about the spectacle of the party’s presumptive nominee discussing Mr. Clinton’s sexual escapades.

    With Mr. Trump as the Republican standard-bearer, the line separating the conservative mischief makers and the party’s more buttoned-up cadre of elected officials and aides has been obliterated. Fusing what had been two separate but symbiotic forces, Mr. Trump has begun a real-life political science experiment: What happens when a major party’s nominee is more provocateur than politician?

    […]

    Roger J. Stone Jr., the political operative who is Mr. Trump’s longtime confidant and an unapologetic stirrer of strife, called Mr. McCain and Mr. Romney “losers” for their more restrained approaches.

    But that is precisely what has many Republicans, and some Democrats, nervous.

    “He’s never been involved in policy making or party building or the normal things a candidate would do,” said Jon Seaton, a Republican strategist. “His whole frame of reference is daytime Fox News and Infowars,” a website run by the conservative commentator Alex Jones.

    Mark Salter, Mr. McCain’s former chief of staff, said Mr. Trump was making common cause with “the lunatic fringe,” citing his willingness to appear on the radio show of Mr. Jones, who has claimed that Michelle Obama is a man.

  • Former Bush Aide: Trump’s Campaign Is Fueled By “Conspiratorial Nonsense”

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    Michael Gerson, syndicated columnist and former aide to President George W. Bush, explained in The Washington Post that presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump’s candidacy is “fueled by conspiracy.”

    Trump has peddled numerous conspiracy theories, including leading the charge in questioning the validity of President Obama’s birth certificate, and claiming vaccines cause autism, that the government lied about the dangers of Ebola, that Muslims cheered on 9/11, and that Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia may have been murdered, among others. Trump regularly surrounds himself with and lauds known conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones, an infamous 9/11 truther, and Roger Stone, a notorious dirty trickster who alleges the Clintons are murderers.

    In a May 23 opinion piece for the Post, Gerson wrote Trump “is not flirting with the fringes” by pushing “conspiratorial nonsense,” but “is French-kissing them.” Gerson explained that “Trump emerged in conservative circles by questioning Barack Obama’s citizenship, and thus the legality of his presidency,” and has since peddled numerous conspiracy theories and has “succeeded by appealing to stereotypes and ugly hatreds.” Gerson warned “every Republican official endorsing Trump” that the conspiratorial “company he keeps … is the company you now keep.” From the May 23 Washington Post opinion piece:

    But it was Donald Trump who led the opposition. He tweeted: “The U.S. must immediately stop all flights from EBOLA infected countries or the plague will start and spread inside our ‘borders.’ Act fast!” And: “Ebola is much easier to transmit than the CDC and government representatives are admitting.”

    Health officials were not lying. Travel to and from West Africa was essential for medical personnel and aid workers to defeat the disease at its point of origin. Trump’s ban would have made Ebola materially more likely to spread beyond control.

    What kind of politics is ascendant in the United States? A distrust of institutions that borders on conspiratorial. Here is Trump again: “Healthy young child goes to doctor, gets pumped with massive shot of many vaccines, doesn’t feel good and changes — AUTISM.” And: “I am being proven right about massive vaccinations — the doctors lied.” And: “So many people who have children with autism have thanked me — amazing response. They know far better than fudged up reports!”

    Lying doctors. Fudged reports. It would all be disturbing — if it were not conspiratorial nonsense. No connection has ever been demonstrated between vaccinations and autism. And this particular nonsense is potentially deadly. Trump is undermining a consensus for vaccination that builds up “herd immunity” and saves the lives of children.

    [...]

    Does Trump really believe that liberals may have ordered a hit on a Supreme Court justice? Who knows? We do know he finds such ideas useful. Trump emerged in conservative circles by questioning Barack Obama’s citizenship, and thus the legality of his presidency. This required the existence of a conspiracy to hide the circumstances of Obama’s birth. “They cannot believe what they’re finding,” he said of “people that have been studying it.” Having actually discovered nothing, Trump doubled down on a deception.

    As a leader, Trump has succeeded by appealing to stereotypes and ugly hatreds that most American leaders have struggled to repress and contain. His political universe consists of deceptive experts, of scheming, of criminal Mexicans, of lying politicians and bureaucrats and of disloyal Muslims. Asked to repudiate David Duke and the Ku Klux Klan, Trump hesitated, later claiming a “bad earpiece.” Asked to repudiate the vicious anti-Semitism of some of his followers, Trump responded, “I don’t have a message to the fans.” Wouldn’t want to offend “the fans.”

    This is not flirting with the fringes; it is French-kissing them. Every Republican official endorsing Trump should know: This is the company he keeps. This is the company you now keep.

  • Roger Stone: Trump Paid Kathleen Willey So She Could Trash Clintons

    Media Matters Releases Video Of Trump Insider Boasting About Trump Giving Willey Money

    ››› ››› MATT GERTZ

    The media is highlighting a new web video from Donald Trump’s presidential campaign that features former White House aide Kathleen Willey accusing Bill Clinton of sexually assaulting her in the 1990s. In video obtained by Media Matters -- published here for the first time -- close Trump ally Roger Stone says Trump himself gave money to Willey so she would be able to attack the Clintons during Hillary Clinton’s current presidential run. The Office of the Independent Counsel reviewed Willey’s allegations but declined to press charges after determining that Willey repeatedly shifted her story, lied to the FBI, and urged a friend to falsely support her story. She subsequently suggested that the Clintons had murdered her husband in the same way they supposedly murdered former White House aide Vince Foster.

  • If We Follow Bill O'Reilly's Logic, Only Trump Sycophants Can Cover Trump

    Blog ››› ››› CRISTINA LOPEZ

    According to Fox's Bill O'Reilly, feminist journalists should not be allowed to report on Donald Trump because “Trump is the antithesis” of feminism. By O’Reilly’s standard, any journalist Trump may have offended would be disqualified from reporting on the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

    On the May 17 edition of Fox News' The O'Reilly Factor, host Bill O'Reilly speculated on whether "the national media can cover Trump with any fairness," suggesting that editors should not let feminist journalists report on Trump because his past in the beauty pageant world would bias feminists against him (emphasis added):

    BILL O'REILLY: She is a feminist. Trump is a beauty contestant purveyor. Do you let a feminist report on a beauty contestant person who is now turned politician?

    [...]

    O’REILLY: Wait, wait. If I'm an editor and I know there is a feminist woman in my newsroom who is brilliant, because I think this woman is an excellent reporter, I don't let her report on a guy like Trump because Trump is the antithesis of that. And so I don't want any margin of error here. There are plenty of reporters who can do the story. Do you not see that?

    Based on O'Reilly's logic, anyone who has reasons to find Trump's positions problematic is unfit to cover him. This standard disqualifies a lot of people:

    • Trump has referred to Mexican immigrants as rapists and drug dealers, so they’re out.
    • Trump sent a culturally offensive tweet featuring a taco bowl on Cinco de Mayo, so Hispanics would be disqualified from covering him.
    • Trump's proposal to ban all Muslims from entering the U.S. means Muslims can't cover him fairly.
    • Trump derided John McCain's status as a war hero because Trump likes "people who weren't captured." So cross off all the journalists who have been captured in conflict zones.
    • Since Trump suggested that women who have had abortions deserved "some form of punishment," any journalist who has had an abortion would be eliminated.
    • Trump mocked a disabled reporter with a congenital joint condition, so any journalist with a disability is off the list.
    • Also disqualified? 97 percent of climate scientists:

     

     

    Under this rubric, the only people left to cover Donald Trump would likely be those who have made softball interviews of the candidate their specialty, like Sean Hannity, those amplifying Trump’s conspiracy theories like Alex Jones, or people who share a “personal friendship” with the candidate, like O’Reilly. Following O’Reilly’s logic, media’s role of vetting, fact-checking and challenging a candidate, would become a thing of the past.

  • Trump Disavowed Racist Butler, But Works With Ally Who Said Clinton Should Be “Executed For Murder”

    Blog ››› ››› OLIVER WILLIS

    Stone

    Donald Trump publicly disavowed his former butler after violent, racist comments from him emerged, but as recently as last week Trump spoke with Roger Stone, who said Hillary Clinton should be “executed” and called an African-American commentator a “stupid negro.”

    Mother Jones reported that Donald Trump’s former butler, Anthony Senecal, who also served as the in-house historian for Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, had posted a series of racist Facebook posts filled with violent imagery directed at President Obama.

    Senecal said “our pus headed ‘president’” should “have been taken out by our military and shot as an enemy agent in his first term.” He also referred to Obama as a “prick” who “needs to be hung for treason.”

    After the story was published, the Secret Service indicated it would be investigating Senecal’s alleged threats.

    The Trump campaign told CNN that they “totally and completely disavow the horrible statements made by him regarding the President.”

    But Trump is still closely connected to dirty trickster Roger Stone even after Stone’s history of violent and racist rhetoric had been exposed.

    Stone worked for Trump’s presidential campaign until August of last year, and since then has promoted Trump’s candidacy and runs a super PAC supporting Trump. Stone said he speaks with Trump “on a semi-regular basis” to discuss politics and the campaign.

    On the May 6 edition of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ radio show, Stone said he had spoken with Trump earlier that day.

    Stone has used rhetoric very similar to the butler that Trump has now condemned.

    On his Twitter feed, Stone claimed that Hillary Clinton "must be brought to justice - arrested , tried , and executed for murder," and called Bernie Sanders a “Soviet agent” who “should be arrested for treason and shot.” Stone also said philanthropist George Soros should be “detained, charged, tried, convicted and executed” and called for Connecticut governor Dan Malloy to be hanged.

    Stone also fantasized about the deaths of several media figures. He told journalist Jill Abramson to “DIE BITCH,” wrote about CNN commentator Ana Navarro “killing herself,” and said of Fox commentator Ed Rollins: “If he isn’t dead he should be.”

    Stone used racist language online as well. He said that commentator Roland Martin is a “stupid negro” and a “fat negro,” called radio host Herman Cain “mandingo,” and described former Rep. Allen West as an “arrogant, know-it-all negro.” Stone also said Al Sharpton is a “professional negro” who likes fried chicken.

    He also referred to Roland Martin (who is African-American) and Ana Navarro (who is Latina) as “quota hires” because they are “so dumb and unqualified that one can reach no other conclusion.”

    After Media Matters publicized Stone’s comments, CNN said they had banned him from appearing on their network, as has MSNBC

    Alex Jones, who has emerged as a leading Trump supporter, called for columnist George Will to “blow what little is left of your brains out” in response to his opposition to Trump’s candidacy.

  • Alex Jones Celebrates Trump Victory By Telling George Will: “Blow What Little Is Left Of Your Brains Out”

    Jones Appears To Have Deleted The Video From His YouTube Account

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI


    Radio host Alex Jones, a top Donald Trump ally and leading conspiracy theorist, celebrated Trump’s likely clinching of the Republican nomination by calling on Trump critic George Will to kill himself.

    Jones is a conspiracy theorist who believes the government was behind the 9/11 attacks and other national tragedies including the Oklahoma City bombing and shootings in Aurora, CO, and Newtown, CT. Trump and his campaign have been courting Alex Jones and his audience. Trump appeared on Jones’ December 2 program and told Jones: “Your reputation's amazing. I will not let you down." Jones claimed he has private conversations with Trump and that the Republican front-runner "listens to what we say." Jones has also teamed up with Trump ally Roger Stone, who is a frequent guest on Jones’ program and is working with Jones for pro-Trump protests at the Republican National Convention. 

    In a rambling YouTube video posted on the night of Trump’s victory in the Indiana Republican primary (h/t Right Wing Watch's Brian Tashman), Jones proclaimed that Trump “is a symbol of nationalism, a symbol of Americana, and a symbol of rebellion against tyranny. And everything the political whores, the presstitutes could do, blew up in their stinking, traitorous faces.” The video appears to have since been removed from Jones' official YouTube account.

    Jones attacked media outlets like Fox News and CNN, claiming they feature “hot blondes crossing and uncrossing their legs, sexually titillating the teleprompter,” and said they have tried to throw the kitchen sink at Trump. 

    He also attacked Washington Post (which is “openly run by the CIA, look it up”) columnist George Will for his criticisms of Trump, calling Will “Ted Bundy” with a “cute little haircut … classic serial killer look.” Jones continued by claiming Will is a “constitutional rapist. This man is literally mounting America, raping it in the ass, and telling us how great he is.” He then directed Will to “look in the mirror, realize you’re a traitor, and do the right thing, and put a .357 Magnum to your head, and blow what little is left of your brains out all over yourself, OK? You traitor, you Benedict Arnold, you piece of filth.” 

    Jones warned his audience that the establishment may still try to “steal the election” from Trump, and said he’s going to be at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland with Roger Stone “to make sure the popular vote in this country counts."

    Jones later said Trump had picked up “our story” about Sen. Ted Cruz’s father supposedly being linked to John F. Kennedy assassin Lee Harvey Oswald. Jones said that observers had “major, major, major freak-outs” at Trump over the Cruz story.

    The conspiracy theorist also responded to Fox News host Greg Gutfeld’s assertion that Trump is pivoting into an "Alex Jones" presidency with his conspiracy theories. Jones claimed that he has a better reach than Fox News and other media outlets, and “my sponsorship’s exploding, my listenership’s exploding.”

    Jones concluded by literally applauding Trump supporters, telling them: “Congratulations to all the Trump supporters that saw through the hype. Congratulations to people who stood up to the Democrat and Republican system. Congratulations to everybody that understands how epic a time we’re living in. Whether Trump’s real or not doesn’t matter -- this is all a massive test of the will of the people. So I want to salute you, and understand we’re on the path to victory. … You are the resistance.”