Doocy Falsely Claims Obama "First President" To "Suggest" 1967 Israeli Borders

››› ››› JUSTIN BERRIER

On Fox & Friends, co-host Steve Doocy falsely claimed that, in his address on the Middle East, President Obama became the "first American president" to "suggest" that the borders of Israel and Palestine should be "based on what things were like back in 1967." In fact, Obama's comments are in line with those of President George W. Bush, who also supported a two-state plan based on pre-1967 borders.

Doocy Falsely Claims Obama Is The "First American President" To "Suggest" Two-State Solution "Based On" 1967 Borders "With Mutually Agreed Swaps"

From the May 20 edition of Fox News' Fox & Friends:

PRESIDENT OBAMA: The United States believes that negotiations should result in two states with permanent Palestinian borders, with Israel, Jordan and Egypt and permanent Israeli borders with Palestine. We believe the borders of Israel and Palestine should be based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states.

DOOCY: Now, here's why a lot of critics of the president say you've got to be kidding us. That essentially, what he's saying is for Israel and Palestine to determine their borders based on what things were like back in 1967, that's what the Palestinians have been asking for all along. He is the first American president to do just that, to suggest that. We've got some graphics to show you what it would mean. First of all, this shows you what Israel looks like right now. OK? Well, under the Obama plan which he is suggesting that they implement, as you could see right there, it would go back to the 1967 days where they would be combined, but the problem is if you combine and Charles Krauthammer talks a little bit about this in one of his columns today. If you were to combine Gaza with the West Bank and the president talked about it being contiguous, you would probably have to split Israel in two. [Fox News, Fox & Friends, 5/20/11]

In Fact, Bush Publically Stated in 2005 That Changes To The 1967 Border "Must Be Mutually Agreed To"

In 2005, Bush Stated: "Any Final Status Agreement Must Be Reached Between The Two Parties, And Changes To The 1949 Armistice Lines Must Be Mutually Agreed To." From Bush's statement during a May 26, 2005, press conference with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas:

Any final status agreement must be reached between the two parties, and changes to the 1949 Armistice Lines must be mutually agreed to. A viable two-state solution must ensure contiguity on the West Bank, and a state of scattered territories will not work. There must also be meaningful linkages between the West Bank and Gaza. This is the position of the United States today; it will be the position of the United States at the time of final status negotiations.

The imminent Israeli disengagement from Gaza, parts of the West Bank, presents an opportunity to lay the groundwork for a return to the roadmap. All parties have a responsibility to make this hopeful moment in the region a new and peaceful beginning. That is why I assigned General Kip Ward, who is with us today, to support your efforts, Mr. President, to reform the Palestinian security services and to coordinate the efforts of the international community to make that crucial task a success. The United States also strongly supports the mission of the Quartet's special envoy, Jim Wolfensohn, to make sure that the Gaza disengagement brings Palestinians a better life.

The Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs refers to the pre-1967 borders between Israel and Palestine as the "1949-1967 Armistice Lines." [Press Conference with Presidents Bush and Abbas, 5/26/05; Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs, accessed 5/19/11]

Posted In
National Security & Foreign Policy, International Conflicts
Network/Outlet
Fox News Channel
Person
Steve Doocy
Show/Publication
FOX & Friends
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