Bolton falsely suggested Obama said "treaties and declarations" more important to post-WWII security than U.S. role

››› ››› MORGAN WEILAND

Fox News contributor and former United Nations ambassador John Bolton falsely characterized President Obama's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, claiming Obama suggested "it's the treaties and declarations that were the centerpiece" of post-World War II global security "and the United States made a small contribution here or there." In fact, Obama suggested that while "the world" may believe that it was "just treaties and declarations" that "brought stability to a post-World War II world," Obama himself also attributed it to how "The United States of America has helped underwrite global security for more than six decades with the blood of our citizens and the strength of our arms," which he stated "has promoted peace and prosperity from Germany to Korea."

Bolton twisted Obama's speech to claim he attributed post-WWII global security to "treaties and declarations" over U.S. "contribution"

From the December 10 edition of Fox News' On the Record with Greta Van Susteren:

BOLTON: OK, then just a few paragraphs later, he [Obama] says, talking about setting up the role of the United States, which many people said was a positive to the speech, he gets to it by saying that stability after World War II was brought about, quote, "not just treaties and declarations that brought stability but the fact the United States helped underwrite global security." As if to say it's the treaties and declarations that were the centerpiece, and that the United States made a small contribution here or there. In fact, it was the American nuclear capability after World War II and the strength of the military alliances led and dominated by the United States that brought stability and defeated the Soviets in the Cold War. That didn't seem to make it into the speech.

While suggesting "the world" may believe "treaties and declarations" established post-WWII "stability," Obama touted U.S. role

Obama made clear his belief in the key role of U.S. in "underwrit[ing] global security" post-WWII. In his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, Obama said that "the world must remember that it was not simply international institutions -- not just treaties and declarations -- that brought stability to a post-World War II world." He continued: "[T]he plain fact is this: The United States of America has helped underwrite global security for more than six decades with the blood of our citizens and the strength of our arms." From Obama's remarks:

But the world must remember that it was not simply international institutions -- not just treaties and declarations -- that brought stability to a post-World War II world. Whatever mistakes we have made, the plain fact is this: The United States of America has helped underwrite global security for more than six decades with the blood of our citizens and the strength of our arms. The service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform has promoted peace and prosperity from Germany to Korea, and enabled democracy to take hold in places like the Balkans. We have borne this burden not because we seek to impose our will. We have done so out of enlightened self-interest -- because we seek a better future for our children and grandchildren, and we believe that their lives will be better if others' children and grandchildren can live in freedom and prosperity. [Obama's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance remarks, 12/10/2009]

Bolton previously called on Obama to "decline" Nobel Peace Prize

Bolton said Obama should "ask to be considered again ... when he has a record." In an October 9 post on the National Review Online blog The Corner, Robert Costa quoted Bolton as saying, "He should decline it and then ask to be considered again in three or four years when he has a record." [National Review Online, 10/9/2009]

Posted In
National Security & Foreign Policy
Network/Outlet
Fox News Channel
Person
John Bolton
Show/Publication
On The Record with Greta Van Susteren
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