Crowley cites poll to show "fertile political ground" for tea parties, but ignores Gallup's conclusion

››› ››› NATHAN TABAK

Candy Crowley claimed that Republicans may find "fertile political ground" on the issue of taxes, citing a Gallup poll on taxes as evidence. However, Gallup said of the results of that poll: "Gallup finds Americans' views of their federal income taxes about as positive as at any point in the last 60 years."

In a report on the April 16 edition of CNN Newsroom on the previous day's tea party protests, CNN senior political correspondent Candy Crowley claimed that taxes "could be just the sort of issue the GOP can wrap itself around to rebuild a party in tatters. And perhaps there is fertile political ground here." As evidence that there may be "fertile political ground" on the taxes issue, Crowley stated: "According to the latest CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll, more than 60 percent of Americans do approve of the way the president is handling taxes. But a recent Gallup poll found that 46 percent of Americans still think taxes are too high; 48 percent think they're just about right. Though on Tax Day, those numbers may be a little different." But in citing the "46 percent" result as evidence of Americans' current dissatisfaction with taxes, Crowley did not note that in its report on the poll, Gallup said: "Gallup finds Americans' views of their federal income taxes about as positive as at any point in the last 60 years."

The report also stated that "[t]ypically a majority of Americans say their taxes are too high." Gallup also stated that "[s]ince 1956, there has been only one other time when a higher percentage of Americans said their taxes were about right."

From Gallup's report by Jeffrey M. Jones titled, "Views of Income Taxes Among Most Positive Since 1956":

A new Gallup Poll finds 48% of Americans saying the amount of federal income taxes they pay is "about right," with 46% saying "too high" -- one of the most positive assessments Gallup has measured since 1956. Typically, a majority of Americans say their taxes are too high, and relatively few say their taxes are too low.

These results are based on the Gallup Economy and Personal Finance poll, conducted each April, including April 6-9 of this year.

Since 1956, there has been only one other time when a higher percentage of Americans said their taxes were about right -- in 2003, when 50% did so after two rounds of tax cuts under the Bush administration.

[...]

As the remaining U.S. tax filers prepare to send their income-tax returns before the April 15 deadline, Gallup finds Americans' views of their federal income taxes about as positive as at any point in the last 60 years. This may reflect the income-tax cut that was part of the $787 billion economic stimulus plan, as well as a continuing sense of patriotism with the country fighting two wars.

From the April 16 edition of CNN Newsroom:

HEIDI COLLINS (co-host): Tax Day 2009 is over, but this year, some American workers sent an angry message to the government. Thousands of people rallied in tax protests yesterday. Is this the start of a bigger movement? We get a closer look from Candy Crowley, CNN's senior political correspondent.

[...]

CROWLEY: Most elected national Republicans kept a low profile, which doesn't mean they aren't watching. For the GOP, this day was a bit of a testing ground. If this is a growing movement instead of a one-day wonder, it could be just the sort of issue the GOP can wrap itself around to rebuild a party in tatters.

And perhaps there is fertile political ground here. According to the latest CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll, more than 60 percent of Americans do approve of the way the president is handling taxes. But a recent Gallup poll found that 46 percent of Americans still think taxes are too high; 48 percent think they're just about right. Though on Tax Day, those numbers may be a little different. Candy Crowley, CNN, Washington.

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Candy Crowley
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