Fox Nation truncated Obama quote, omitted criticism of "anti-Americanism" in Europe

››› ››› GREG LEWIS

The Fox Nation featured the headline "Obama on Foreign Soil: 'America Has Shown Arrogance' " and omitted the president's criticism of "anti-Americanism" in Europe.

On April 3, Fox News' newly launched website, The Fox Nation, featured a front-page headline reading: "Obama on Foreign Soil: 'America Has Shown Arrogance.' " The headline linked to a Fox Nation page, which consisted of the same headline; a link to an April 3 U.K. Telegraph article about President Obama's speech at a town hall that day in Strasbourg, France; and the Telegraph article's lede, which read, "President Barack Obama has offered an apology for the Bush era, declaring that America had 'shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derisive' towards its allies." However, neither The Fox Nation front-page headline nor The Fox Nation page it linked to noted that in the next lines of his speech, Obama, in the words of the Telegraph article, "balanced this striking admission with a tough message to Europeans that blaming America was foolish," saying: "But in Europe, there is an anti-Americanism that is at once casual but can also be insidious. Instead of recognizing the good that America so often does in the world, there have been times where Europeans choose to blame America for much of what's bad." Obama subsequently stated: "On both sides of the Atlantic, these attitudes have become all too common. They are not wise. They do not represent the truth. They threaten to widen the divide across the Atlantic and leave us both more isolated. They fail to acknowledge the fundamental truth that America cannot confront the challenges of this century alone, but that Europe cannot confront them without America."

From Obama's speech:

Such an effort is never easy. It's always harder to forge true partnerships and sturdy alliances than to act alone, or to wait for the action of somebody else. It's more difficult to break down walls of division than to simply allow our differences to build and our resentments to fester. So we must be honest with ourselves. In recent years we've allowed our Alliance to drift. I know that there have been honest disagreements over policy, but we also know that there's something more that has crept into our relationship. In America, there's a failure to appreciate Europe's leading role in the world. Instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges, there have been times where America has shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derisive.

But in Europe, there is an anti-Americanism that is at once casual but can also be insidious. Instead of recognizing the good that America so often does in the world, there have been times where Europeans choose to blame America for much of what's bad.

On both sides of the Atlantic, these attitudes have become all too common. They are not wise. They do not represent the truth. They threaten to widen the divide across the Atlantic and leave us both more isolated. They fail to acknowledge the fundamental truth that America cannot confront the challenges of this century alone, but that Europe cannot confront them without America.

So I've come to Europe this week to renew our partnership, one in which America listens and learns from our friends and allies, but where our friends and allies bear their share of the burden. Together, we must forge common solutions to our common problems.

So let me say this as clearly as I can: America is changing, but it cannot be America alone that changes. We are confronting the greatest economic crisis since World War II. The only way to confront this unprecedented crisis is through unprecedented coordination.

From The Fox Nation:

From the April 3 Telegraph article:

Barack Obama: 'arrogant US has been dismissive' to allies

President Barack Obama has offered an apology for the Bush era, declaring that America had "shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derisive" towards its allies.

President Obama said the US had "failed to appreciate Europe's leading role in the world".

His speech in Strasbourg went further than any United States president in history in criticising his own country's action while standing on foreign soil.

But he sought to use the mea culpa as leverage to alter European views of America and secure more troops for the war in Afghanistan.

He declared that there had to be a fundamental shift on both sides of the Atlantic. "America is changing but it cannot be America alone that changes," he said.

Addressing a crowd of some 2,000 mainly students from France and Germany, Mr Obama said: "In America, there is a failure to appreciate Europe's leading role in the world.

"Instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges, there have been times where America has shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derisive."

He then balanced this striking admission with a tough message to Europeans that blaming America was foolish.

"But in Europe, there is an anti-Americanism that is at once casual, but can also be insidious. Instead of recognising the good that America so often does in the world, there have been times where Europeans choose to blame America for much of what is bad.

"On both sides of the Atlantic, these attitudes have become all too common. They are not wise. They do not represent the truth. They threaten to widen the divide across the Atlantic and leave us both more isolated. They fail to acknowledge the fundamental truth that America cannot confront the challenges of this century alone, but that Europe cannot confront them without America."

Posted In
National Security & Foreign Policy
Network/Outlet
Fox Nation
We've changed our commenting system to Disqus.
Instructions for signing up and claiming your comment history are located here.
Updated rules for commenting are here.