For second day in a row, NY Times falsely suggested Bill Clinton refuses to disclose source of speaking fees

››› ››› LAUREN AUERBACH

In an article about whether Sen. Hillary Clinton would accept the position of secretary of state in an Obama administration, The New York Times reported that aides to President-elect Barack Obama "have been reviewing Mr. [Bill] Clinton's business dealings, focusing on the array of his post-presidential activities, some details of which have not been made public. That includes the identity of most of the donors to his foundation" and "the source of some of his speaking fees." But the Times did not note that the source and amount of all of Bill Clinton's speaking fees of $200 or more are disclosed annually in Hillary Clinton's Senate disclosure forms.

In a November 18 New York Times article about whether Sen. Hillary Clinton would accept the position of secretary of state in an Obama administration, Raymond Hernandez and Michael Luo reported: "Mr. [Barack] Obama's aides this week have been reviewing Mr. [Bill] Clinton's business dealings, focusing on the array of his post-presidential activities, some details of which have not been made public. That includes the identity of most of the donors to his foundation, the source of some of his speaking fees -- he has earned as much as $425,000 for a one-hour speech -- and his work for the billionaire investor Ronald W. Burkle." In fact, Bill Clinton's speaking fees are disclosed annually in Hillary Clinton's Senate disclosure forms -- including a $425,000 speech he delivered on August 14, 2007, for AEG London, which was listed in Hillary Clinton's 2008 Senate disclosure form.

As Media Matters for America noted, Hillary Clinton is required to disclose all speaking fees she and/or her husband earned of $200 or more, according to the Senate disclosure form. If Hillary Clinton remains in the Senate, Bill Clinton's 2008 speaking fees would be included in her 2009 Senate disclosure forms. If Hillary Clinton becomes secretary of state, executive branch financial disclosure rules would require her -- as the Senate does -- to disclose speaking fees earned by Bill Clinton of $200 or more.

This is the second time in two days in which the Times has misled on the disclosure of Bill Clinton's speaking fees.

From Hernandez and Luo's November 18 New York Times article:

The Clinton camp on Tuesday sought to rebut reports that former President Bill Clinton's finances and other interests could block Mrs. Clinton's path to an appointment.

Mr. Obama's aides this week have been reviewing Mr. Clinton's business dealings, focusing on the array of his post-presidential activities, some details of which have not been made public.

That includes the identity of most of the donors to his foundation, the source of some of his speaking fees -- he has earned as much as $425,000 for a one-hour speech -- and his work for the billionaire investor Ronald W. Burkle.

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