The Hill claimed McCain has "court[ed] Hispanic voters" with immigration legislation, but didn't mention his reversal on his own bill

››› ››› TOM ALLISON

Reporting on Sen. John McCain's efforts to "attract" Hispanic voters, The Hill's Klaus Marre wrote that McCain "has spent the past few years courting Hispanic voters by being the lead Republican sponsor of failed immigration legislation that would have granted a path to citizenship to most of the more than 12 million illegal immigrants living in the United States." But Marre did not note that McCain has said he no longer supports that legislation.

In a May 5 online article headlined "McCain courts Hispanic voters," The Hill reported that "[t]he Arizona senator has spent the past few years courting Hispanic voters by being the lead Republican sponsor of failed immigration legislation that would have granted a path to citizenship to most of the more than 12 million illegal immigrants living in the United States." Hill writer Klaus Marre did not note, however, that Sen. John McCain abandoned his own comprehensive immigration reform proposal, saying that he would no longer support it if it came up for a vote in the Senate. McCain now says that "we've got to secure the borders first" -- a position at odds with his prior assertion that border security could not be disaggregated from other aspects of comprehensive immigration reform without being rendered ineffective. Further, Marre failed to note that McCain has also reversed his position on the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, which would have allowed "illegal immigrants under age 30 to remain in the United States and gain legal status if they attend college or join the military."

The May 5 Hill article in its entirety:

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) on Monday launched a Spanish-language website, hoping to attract a demographic that is becoming increasingly important in national elections.

The presumptive GOP presidential nominee also pledged to attend the annual convention for the National Council for La Raza in July, and released a statement recognizing the Cinco de Mayo holiday. He noted that the Battle of Puebla was "an important moment in the history of Mexico."

McCain stressed that the relationship between Mexico and the U.S. is an "important friendship" and said Cinco de Mayo is a day to "celebrate the many contributions Mexican-Americans have made to our society, culture, security and economy."

The Arizona senator has spent the past few years courting Hispanic voters by being the lead Republican sponsor of failed immigration legislation that would have granted a path to citizenship to most of the more than 12 million illegal immigrants living in the United States.

McCain's new website features press releases as well as videos featuring prominent Hispanic Republicans, such as Sen. Mel Martinez (Fla.) and Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.).

Hispanic voters are becoming increasingly important as the group continues to grow nationally and in important swing states, such as New Mexico and Colorado.

Posted In
Elections, Immigration, Immigration Reform
Network/Outlet
The Hill
Stories/Interests
John McCain, 2008 Elections
We've changed our commenting system to Disqus.
Instructions for signing up and claiming your comment history are located here.
Updated rules for commenting are here.