Elections

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  • Wash. Post's Balz asserted Giuliani "[a]t odds" with GOP "on abortion, guns and gays," despite moving to the right on those issues

    ››› ››› JEREMY HOLDEN

    A Washington Post article by Dan Balz described Rudy Giuliani as "[a]t odds with the majority of his party on abortion, guns and gays," but failed to note that Giuliani has shifted his position on these issues, moving toward more conservative stances on them, since launching his campaign for the 2008 Republican presidential nomination.

  • Russert did not challenge Romney's misleading statements about stem cell research

    ››› ››› JULIE MILLICAN

    On Meet the Press, Mitt Romney claimed Hillary Clinton "put politics ahead of people" because "she was one of 28 [senators] to vote against alternative methods" of stem cell research. In fact, while Clinton voted against legislation that would have provided funding for alternative research measures, but restricted embryonic stem cell research, she voted for a bill that contained provisions providing for research relating to "alternative method technologies" and also expanded funding for embryonic stem cell research. Romney also touted a recent "breakthrough" on "alternative methods of creating stem cells without having to create new embryos" while failing to note that the senior American scientist involved in the "breakthrough" has emphasized the need to continue embryonic stem cell research. Meet the Press host Tim Russert did not challenge Romney on his claims.

  • MSNBC's O'Donnell claimed Penn "on his own brought up cocaine" -- but Matthews started conversation

    ››› ››› JEREMY HOLDEN

    On the December 13 edition of Tucker, Norah O'Donnell asserted that during the same day's Hardball, Clinton adviser Mark Penn "once again brought up cocaine -- twice" in relation to Sen. Barack Obama and later claimed that Penn "on his own brought up cocaine." In fact, the entire Hardball segment was devoted to controversial remarks regarding Obama's past drug use made by Clinton's campaign co-chair, who later resigned. Chris Matthews explicitly asked Penn at least three distinct questions about the topic, and Penn had offered at least two specific responses before he used the word "cocaine."

  • Wash. Post's Givhan suggested political motivation for Obama's choice of tie colors

    ››› ››› SIMON MALOY

    The Washington Post's Robin Givhan wrote: "One of the most distinctive elements of Barack Obama's public style comes down to what he so often is not wearing: patriotism on his sleeve." Givhan continued: "No flag pin on the lapel. No hand on heart during the national anthem. And he generally shuns bold red ties." In the piece, Givhan offered no explanation as to how a "bold red tie" is a "usual symbol[] of nationalism and politics," or how Obama's alleged avoidance of "bold red ties" constitutes a statement on patriotism.

  • Wash. Post's Solomon ignored Planned Parenthood support for Obama's abortion votes

    ››› ››› SIMON MALOY

    In an article on "what you might not know about" Sen. Barack Obama, The Washington Post's John Solomon wrote that, as a state senator, Obama "declined to take a position" on parental notification legislation, "voting 'present' instead of 'yes' or 'no.' " Solomon continued: "But five years earlier, he had filled out an issues questionnaire ... opposing such notifications." But Obama's "present" votes were reportedly part of a strategy he had worked out with the Illinois Planned Parenthood Council, which opposed the measures.

  • While moderating GOP debate, Des Moines Register editor cited McCain's "maverick" reputation

    ››› ››› ANDREW WALZER

    Echoing the media's common characterization of Sen. John McCain as "principled" and "honest" -- and ignoring the various instances in which McCain has fallen in line with the Bush administration or the Republican Party establishment -- Des Moines Register editor Carolyn Washburn, moderator of the recent Republican debate, asked McCain: "Your reputation as a maverick has put you at odds with your own party leadership from time to time. Give us an example of a time you wished you had compromised to get something done instead of holding firm on your ideals."

  • O'Reilly to caller: "I don't think your assessment" that Oprah's "voting for [Obama] because he's black" "is wrong"

    ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    On his radio show, Bill O'Reilly took a call from a listener who said, "It sounds like [Oprah Winfrey is] voting for [Sen. Barack Obama] because he's black." O'Reilly responded: "I don't think your assessment is wrong." In a recent speech, after naming several specific actions Obama has taken, Winfrey said: "We need a president with clarity and conviction, who knows how to consult his own conscience and proceed with moral authority. We need Barack Obama."

  • Couric did not challenge Giuliani's assertion that "Iran is moving toward" obtaining "nuclear weapons"

    ››› ››› JULIE MILLICAN

    Responding to a question from CBS' Katie Couric, Rudy Giuliani asserted that "Iran is moving toward accomplishing the worst nightmare of the Cold War -- nuclear weapons in the hands of an irresponsible regime. And then they're threatening the use of these weapons." Although the most recent National Intelligence Estimate on Iran concluded with "high confidence" that Iran had "halt[ed]" its nuclear weapons program in 2003, Couric did not challenge Giuliani's assertion or ask him a follow-up question about his answer.

  • O'Reilly: "I think that Obama needs to answer some questions about his point of view, not only on the USA, but on a lot of things"

    ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    On his radio show, Bill O'Reilly replied to a caller who said she was "disturb[ed]" over an email she received about Sen. Barack Obama, showing he was "the only one with his hand not over his heart" during the "Pledge of Allegiance," and "over the lapel pin thing," by saying, "Well, I think that Obama needs to answer some questions about his point of view, not only on the USA, but on a lot of things, and he simply doesn't do it."

  • NBC's Gregory, Lauer didn't challenge Romney's claims on religious test

    ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    On NBC's Today, David Gregory stated that, in his speech, Mitt Romney "urged voters to reject a religious test for his candidacy," then aired clips of Romney saying, "I will serve no one religion," and "[a] person should not be elected because of his faith, nor should he be rejected because of his faith." Similarly, Matt Lauer did not challenge Romney's claim that he "do[es]n't believe that the people in this country are going to choose a person based upon their faith or what church they go to." Neither Gregory nor Lauer noted that Romney has asserted, on several occasions, that Americans "want a person of faith to lead them."

  • Wash. Post's Milbank compares Edwards' haircuts to undocumented workers at Romney's home while "he's complaining about illegal immigrants"

    ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    On Countdown, Keith Olbermann asked Dana Milbank about the repeated references in The Washington Post to the cost of John Edwards' haircuts, including in his own column. Milbank replied that he is "guilty of the haircut slander" and added: "[T]he $400 dollar haircut speaks of that the same way Romney having the illegal immigrants twice return to work in his home even ... as he's complaining about illegal immigrants." While Milbank identified an inconsistency between Romney's actions and his stated views, he offered no justification for suggesting a similar inconsistency in Edwards' efforts to fight poverty while paying for expensive haircuts.

  • Rove touted Russert question on Clinton library docs based on falsehood

    ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    On Hannity & Colmes, Karl Rove referenced a question posed by Tim Russert to Hillary Clinton during the October 30 Democratic presidential debate, in which Russert stated: "[T]here was a letter written by President Clinton specifically asking that any communication between you and the president not be made available to the public until 2012. Would you lift the ban?" In fact, President Clinton did not ask that such communications "not be made available"; he listed them as documents to be "considered for withholding."

  • Scarborough: "[I]t seems to me you have your Holocaust deniers ... then you have your Giuliani deniers"

    ››› ››› ANDREW WALZER

    On Morning Joe, without citing any examples, Joe Scarborough stated, "[Y]ou have your Holocaust deniers ... then you have your Giuliani deniers. And Giuliani deniers will tell you he had nothing to do with September 11th." But as Mika Brzezinski later noted, "There are a lot of people who have a lot of criticisms for Rudy Giuliani, and how he handled 9-11 before it happened."

  • Limbaugh misrepresented Bill Moyers, said "I'm pretty sure he's lost his mind"

    ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    On his radio show, Rush Limbaugh aired a clip of Bill Moyers saying: "And you couldn't say, 'How are we going to defeat the nigger?' How are we going to -- which is the word that was so common when I was growing up in the South. 'How are you going to defeat the kike?' referring to Jews -- you wouldn't do -- that woman would not have done that, I don't think." After the clip, Limbaugh said: "I have no idea what he's talking about. I do -- I'm pretty sure he's lost his mind. Meanwhile, they accuse us of saying those words and harboring those thoughts, and now look who's out saying them on PBS." At no point during the show did Limbaugh note that Moyers was discussing Sen. John McCain's response to a woman who asked him: "How do we beat the bitch?"